Potent quotables: Marathon edition

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It was too good to be true. As Josh Beckett and A.J. Burnett matched
zeroes early on Friday, the game was moving along at an
abnormally brisk pace. But a funny thing capt.6443de45c8e84d5d8365bf47a31f0846.aptopix_red_sox_yankees_baseball_nyy209.jpghappened in the Bronx. The
teams forgot how to score a run. They went a combined 0-for-19 with
runners in scoring position. They struck out 14 times a piece.
They combined to use 14 pitchers. It took five hours and 33 minutes to
come to a conclusion. It was wonderful.

The game was everything we envision the postseason to be at it’s most dramatic, from Josh Reddick and Melky
Cabrera’s almost game-winners, to J.D. Drew’s game-saving catch to Alex
Rodriguez’s thrilling walk-off blast in the 15th. The new Yankee Stadium
may have opened in April, but this was it’s close-up.

Here’s just some of the reaction from Friday night’s 15-inning marathon:

“It was a big game at the beginning, and it just kept getting bigger
and bigger. You don’t want to go 15 innings and lose
those big pitching performances on both sides.”

– Alex Rodriguez, who sent Yankees’ fans home happy with his walk-off
blast. The game-winner broke a career-worst 72 at-bat homerless drought.

“I thought his poise was fantastic. We knew that, or he wouldn’t be here. That was certainly easing him into the fire.”

– Terry Francona comments on 23-year-old Junichi Tazawa, who gave up
the game-winning blast to Alex Rodriguez
in his major league debut.

“When he caught that ball, that’s when I thought the game was never going to end.”

– Derek Jeter marvels at J.D. Drew’s game-saving catch in the 14th inning.

“It’s one of those plays where it’s kind of a do-or-die situation. Guys on, [Eric] Hinske’s up, you make a beeline straight
across the field, stick your glove up, see what happens. I don’t know
how in the world it ended up in my glove.”

– J.D. Drew still doesn’t know how he caught that ball.

“It was awesome. It was an environment, really, I can’t
describe. You see the whole place pretty much full in the 15th. And to
come off the field and get that ovation, I’ve never experienced that
before. It was amazing.”

– A.J. Burnett showed that he is ready for the big stage. Battling
through a shaky first inning, Burnett matched Josh Beckett, tossing 7
2/3 shutout inning, allowing just a leadoff single to Jacoby Ellsbury.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.