Link-O-Rama: Seattle relievers no longer gladiators

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* This is easily the greatest sentence I’ve read this week: “Prior to Tuesday night’s series opener against the Royals, the Mariners were told by Major League Baseball officials that the gladiator helmets the relievers have been toting around with them could no longer be taken onto the field, or be in the bullpen during games.”
* For the second time this season all 300 pounds of Bartolo Colon have gone missing from the White Sox and the “have you seen this man?” photo from the Chicago Sun-Times story is guaranteed to haunt your dreams. Seriously, you’ve been warned.
* My favorite mainstream newspaper sports columnist is now my favorite Sports Illustrated staffer who occasionally writes for a newspaper. Or something. Joe Posnanski has taken a senior writer position at SI and writing for the Kansas City Star will no longer be his primary gig, although he apparently plans to continue writing for the newspaper occasionally. Whatever the case, it’s a huge addition for SI and a huge loss for the people of Kansas City. Posnanski is one of his generation’s elite baseball writers.
* Bill James is one of the greatest, best selling, and most influential baseball writers of all time, with a 30-year catalog of amazing work, yet it’s 2009 and a high-profile columnist for one of country’s largest newspapers calls him “the stat geek who has made a fortune taking credit for having invented on-base percentage.” I’m not even sure where to begin with the wrongheadedness of that description, so I won’t even try, but wow are there some cranky, uninformed old dudes writing about sports.

Hall of Fame will no longer use Chief Wahoo on Hall of Fame plaques

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Last month, in the wake of his election to the Hall of Fame, Jim Thome made it clear that he wanted to be inducted as a Cleveland Indian but that he did not want to have Chief Wahoo on his plaque.

His reasoning: even though that was the cap he wore for almost all of his time in Cleveland, “because of all the history and everything involved” he did not think it was the right thing to do. The context, of course, was the club’s decision, under pressure from Major League Baseball, to scrap the Wahoo logo due to its racial insensitivity, which it appears Thome agrees with.

Hall plaque decisions are not 100% up to the player, however. Rather, the Hall of Fame, while taking player sentiment into account, makes a judgment about the historical accuracy and representativeness of Hall plaques. This is to prevent a club from entering into a contract with a player to wear its logo on the plaque even if he only played with them for a short time or from a player simply picking his favorite club (or spiting his least-favorite), even if he only spent an inconsequential season or two there. Think Wade Boggs as a Devil Ray or Frank Robinson as, I dunno, a Dodger.

In the case of Chief Wahoo, the Hall has not only granted Thome’s wish, but has decreed that no new plaque will have Wahoo on it going forward:

To be fair, I can’t think of another player who wore Wahoo who would make the Hall of Fame in an Indians cap after Thome. Possibly Manny Ramirez if he ever gets in, though he may have a better claim to a Red Sox cap (debate it in the comments). Albert Belle appears on Veterans Committee ballots, but I’d bet my cats that he’s never getting it in. If younger players like Corey Kluber or Francisco Lindor or someone make it in, they’ll likely have just as much history in a Block-C or whatever the Indians get to replace Wahoo with than anything else, so it’s not really an issue for them.

Still, a nice gesture from the Hall, both to accommodate Thome’s wishes and to acknowledge the inappropriateness of using Chief Wahoo for any purpose going forward.