Hal McCoy given his walking papers

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 We in the blogosphere get a lot of mileage out of ripping on print journalists, but Spink Award winner Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily news is one of the truly good ones.  He knows baseball — specifically Reds’ baseball — better than you know your children, and unlike so many other writers who seem to have lost their love of the game years ago, McCoy’s enthusiasm was still apparent even after thirty-seven years on the beat.

Unfortunately, there will not be a year thirty-eight:

The newspaper told me today that it will no longer cover the Cincinnati Reds the same way it has in the past, beginning next season. And don’t blame the paper. It is the economic times and we’re all suffering. They just can’t afford the more than a quarter of a million dollars a year to send me coast-to-coast . . .

. . . Right now I’m on the back patio, enjoying a Tanqueray and tonic with my beautiful and supportive wife, Nadine. I’m sure it is the first of many tonight, so I wanted to get this down before I became incoherent.

Though McCoy is 68, he has not lost his fastball, and seeing a good guy like this be put out to pasture is sad indeed.

I understand the economics of it all, but losing guys like this is going to make understanding what’s happening and why with Reds baseball all the more difficult and all the less enjoyable.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.