A's release Jason Giambi

Leave a comment

Earlier this week MLB.com beat writer Mychael Urban speculated that the A’s were debating cutting Jason Giambi loose after manager Bob Geren danced around a question about why they were delaying activating him from the disabled list. Turns out Urban was right on the money, because Oakland released Giambi this afternoon.
The move makes sense from an on-field standpoint, because a last-place team in full-on rebuilding mode has no real need for a 38-year-old who hit .193 with a career-low .697 OPS in 83 games prior to landing on the DL, but it was still probably a tough decision for Billy Beane and company given Giambi’s amazing, MVP-winning run in Oakland from 1995-2001.
In a perfect world Giambi would’ve returned to Oakland for one more season and hit .250 with a bunch of homers and walks while the team hung in contention into September, but the A’s playoff chances basically vanished in May, Giambi looks to be more or less washed up, and the team is better off cycling through young players with an toward the future.
Giambi should be able to latch on somewhere as a part-time player or bench bat if he wants to keep going, because 11 homers, 14 doubles, and 50 walks in 328 plate appearances show that he still has a little something left in the tank. However, his days of being an everyday player are almost surely over and given the aging sluggers who’ve struggled to find work recently it wouldn’t be shocking if this is the end of the line.
Giambi is one of 12 players to appear in over 1,000 games for the A’s since the team moved to Oakland in 1968 and during that time he’s the franchise’s only .300 hitter while also ranking first in OPS, second in on-base percentage and slugging percentage, third in doubles, fifth in homers and walks, sixth in RBIs, eighth in runs, and ninth in hits.

Zach Britton allowed an earned run for the first time since April 30

BALTIMORE, MD - AUGUST 22:  Zach Britton #53 of the Baltimore Orioles pitches for his 38th save in the ninth inning during a baseball game against the the Washington Nationals at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on August 22, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland.  The Oriole won 4-3.  (Photo by Mitchell Layton/Getty Images)
Mitchell Layton/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Orioles closer Zach Britton had appeared in a major league record 43 consecutive games without allowing an earned run, spanning May 5 to August 22. That streak came to an end on Wednesday evening against the Nationals.

The Orioles entered the bottom of the ninth inning holding a 10-3 lead, but reliever Parker Bridwell immediately found himself in hot water. He yielded back-to-back singles to Danny Espinosa and Clint Robinson. He was able to strike out Trea Turner, but walked Jayson Werth to load the bases. Daniel Murphy then crushed his first career grand slam to make it a 10-7 game. That prompted manager Buck Showalter to bring in Britton.

Britton, too, was knocked around. He served up a single to Bryce Harper, followed by a double to Anthony Rendon that scored Harper, pushing the score to 10-8 and ending Britton’s streak. Wilson Ramos reached on a fielder’s choice back to Britton, but the lefty finally finished the game by getting Ryan Zimmerman to ground into a game-ending 4-6-3 double play.

Britton now holds a nice 0.69 ERA with 38 saves and a 61/16 K/BB ratio in 52 innings of work this season.

A fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 24:  A fan is escorted by police out of the New York Yankees dugout after climbing onto its roof, stumbling and falling into the dugout during the game against the Seattle Mariners at Safeco Field on August 24, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
1 Comment

Per Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News, a fan fell into the Yankees’ dugout at Safeco Field in the eighth inning of Wednesday afternoon’s game against the Mariners.

The Yankees were heading into the bottom half of the inning when catcher Brian McCann heard “a loud thud” and looked over to find a fan laying on the dugout floor. According to McCann, the fan “basically knocked himself out.”

Manager Joe Girardi said the incident “kind of freaked me out, actually.”

McCann added, “You don’t know his intentions. It looked like he was trying to run on the field, but he didn’t make it there. It could have been worse.”

That McCann and Girardi aren’t immediately trusting of an uninvited visitor to the dugout has merit. In 2002, two fans ran onto the field and attacked Tom Gamboa, then the Royals’ first base coach. One of the two was in possession of a knife. Typically, fans that trespass are drunk and want attention, but to echo McCann’s sentiment, you never know.