Brian Giles' legal problems may go away soon

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Remember the ugly business with Brian Giles and the palimony suit and the physical abuse and all of that? Some of it may be going away soon:

The attorney for Brian Giles’ ex-girlfriend has asked to be dropped from her $10 million palimony suit against the Padres outfielder, citing a breakdown in communication with his client. Cary Goldstein, whose aggressive tactics often irked the Giles team, wrote in court papers that he and his client, Cheri Olvera, “are not able to communicate effectively.” He also said Olvera has not complied with certain terms of their retainer agreement. Olvera sued Giles last year, accusing him of a string of abuse while they were together. Some of her claims were corroborated with witness statements, including from a Phoenix bar in August 2006.

While there are a lot of reasons a lawyer might withdraw from a case like this, when he or she cites “breakdown in communication” with the client, it usually suggests something that goes to the heart of the case. Things such as the client being a whack job or disingenuous or the evidence not really materializing or what have you. It also makes it really, really hard for the client to find a new lawyer. At least a decent one, because no one else wants a part of that kind of trouble. Upshot: the lawsuit against Giles may go away pretty soon.

Not that this exonerates Mr. Giles in any way, because that video of the incident in Phoenix — not to mention Giles’ guilty plea to misdemeanor domestic violence charges — speaks for itself, and quite loudly at that. So, Brian Giles: still a scumbag for abusing a woman, but possibly close to being out of the legal woods.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: