Prince Fielder goes crazy for no good reason

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Prince Fielder got plunked by Guillermo Mota in the ninth, and then this happened:

Fielder took off for the Dodgers’ side of the stadium after the final out, shouting obscenities all the way to the clubhouse door. Several teammates trailed behind him in a surreal scene, but Bill Hall and Casey McGehee got a firm grip on Fielder while a wall of security blocked his way.

Obviously Fielder was hot about Mota’s pitch! Listen to him unload in the post-game interviews!

“He came inside. It just got away from him. It happens. That’s baseball. He tried to come inside.”

Er, yeah. I can only assume that by that point he had had a conversation with his union rep or the lithium had kicked in or something. Best part: he claimed not to recall that whole storm the clubhouse incident from a few minutes prior. That ought to keep the fines and suspensions at bay!

What kills me about this is that, though I think the code of plunkings in baseball is totally stupid, within the context of that code the Mota plunk was totally legit. Manny Ramirez had hit a homer and a two-run double by the time he came to bat in the seventh, and the Brewers were losing ugly when Chris Smith hit him. That happens from time to time, and when it does, the plunking team has to expect that someone on their side is going to get hit in return. Fielder is the obvious target for that, and as long as the ball hits the dude on the rump or somewhere similarly padded (which is everywhere on Fielder), folks tend to move on.

Why Fielder flipped like he did is beyond me, especially given Ryan Braun’s whole “tell Mr. Selig, we’ll see what happens. It’s going to be interesting” business and subsequent beanball war with the Pirates earlier this season.

It’s as if someone needs to write down all of the unwritten rules for the Brewers, because they clearly don’t understand them.

Boston is naming a street after David Ortiz

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The Red Sox are going to retire David Ortiz’s number 34 tomorrow. The City of Boston is going to give Ortiz a different honor: they’re going to name a street after him.

The street: Yawkey Way Extension, which will be renamed David Ortiz Drive. Note: this is not the Yawkey Way that runs outside of Fenway Park. This is the, duh, extension of it beyond Brookline Avenue just to the northwest. See here, via Google Maps:

There is already a David Ortiz Bridge, which is the bridge that takes Brookline over the Turnpike just north of what will now be David Ortiz Way.

Now: rename Yawkey Way and we’re really cooking with gas.

Yoenis Cespedes advises younger player to hustle

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Bill wrote last night about Yasiel Puig admiring a homer and raising the ire of the New York Mets because of it. I expanded on that some in the recaps. As far as significant baseball events go, it ain’t one. It’s just a silly thing that happened in one of 15 games and is, at best a minor footnote in the Chronicle of the Unwritten Rules.

But it does deserve one more post, because I missed something from it all. This passage from the AP recap of the game:

“He disrespected us,” Flores said. “I think there’s a way to enjoy a home run. That was too much.”

Between innings, Mets veteran Jose Reyes and outfielder Yoenis Cespedes, also from Cuba, spoke with Puig on the field.

“After I talked to Cespedes, he told me, `Try to run a little bit faster,’ and tried to give me some advice,” Puig said through a translator. “I don’t look at it that way, but it is what it is.”

Because, obviously, when you think about respect, professionalism, decorum and the proper way to comport oneself, you think about Jose Reyes. And when you think about hustle, you think about Yoenis Cespedes.