It's Aug. 3: Do you know where your first-round pick is?

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Two weeks before the signing deadline, only 12 of the 32 first-round picks from the 2009 draft has signed. 16 of the top 20 players taken remain unsigned amidst rumors that the commissioner’s office is taking its hardest stance yet on curbing bonuses to players not yet apart of the MLBPA.
Baseball America reported back in May that the commissioner’s office had dropped its all important slot recommendations by 10 percent from its 2008 figures, and it looks like the paper has been proven correct. Of the 12 picks that have signed, five have received exactly what BA estimated for slot: the Angels’ Randal Grichuk ($1.242 million), the Angels’ Mike Trout ($1.215 million), the Brewers’ Eric Arnett ($1.197), the Red Sox’s Reymond Fuentes ($1.134 million) and the Cubs’ Brett Jackson ($972,000).
Six of the remaining seven signed for less than slot, including No. 4 overall pick Tony Sanchez and 10th pick Drew Storen, both of whom had agreed to predraft deals. The only player so far to sign over slot was the Astros’ Jiovanni Mier., the 21st selection, and he exceeded the amount by a mere $26,000 ($1.358 million vs. $1.332 million).
The assumption is that some of the other players have agreed to terms, but that the commissioner’s office is holding back approval. Peter Gammons went so far as to write that the Royals have reached deals with 12th overall pick Aaron Crow and 91st pick Wil Myers, but that the commish had threatened to yank Kansas City’s upcoming All-Star Game in 2012 if they went ahead with them. Maybe Bud Selig and company can’t get away with voiding signings they don’t like, but they can at least pressure teams to wait until Aug. 17 to announce them, thereby preventing truly unsigned players from using those amounts in negotiations.
If, for instance, Reds and No. 8 pick Mike Leake had come to terms on an above-slot $2.4 million bonus, No. 7 pick Mike Minor would use that as artillery in his talks with the Braves. As is, there’s very little besides last year’s bonuses for the unsigned picks to latch on to.
Nearly everyone is going to end up getting signed. No. 1 pick Stephen Strasburg (Nationals) and No. 11 selection Tyler Matzek (Rockies) are the most likely holdouts, with No. 3 pick Donavan Tate (Padres) and No. 14 pick Matt Purke (Rangers) also possibilities. Selig’s precious slots aren’t going to apply to those four.

Bruce Maxwell is the first MLB player to take a knee during the National Anthem

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Athletics’ rookie catcher Bruce Maxwell did not stand for the National Anthem on Saturday night. He’s the first MLB player to do so and, like other professional athletes before him, used the moment to send a message — not just to shed light on the lack of racial equality in the United States, but to specifically protest President Donald Trump’s suggestion that NFL owners fire any of their players who elect to protest the anthem by sitting or kneeling.

“Bruce’s father is a proud military lifer. Anyone who knows Bruce or his parents is well aware that the Maxwells’ love and appreciation for our country is indisputable,” Maxwell’s agent, Matt Sosnick, relayed to the San Francisco Chronicle’s Susan Slusser on Friday. He continued:

Bruce has made it clear that he is taking a stand about what he perceives as racial injustices in this country, and his personal disappointment with President Trump’s response to a number of professional athletes’ totally peaceful, non-violent protests.

Bruce has shared with both me and his teammates that his feelings have nothing to do with a lack of patriotism or a hatred of any man, but rather everything to do with equality for men, women and children regardless of race or religion.

While Maxwell didn’t make his own statement to the media, he took to Instagram earlier in the day to express his frustration against the recent opposition to the protests, criticizing the President for endorsing “division of man and rights.”

Despite Trump’s profanity-laced directive to NFL owners on Friday, however, it’s clear the Athletics don’t share his sentiments. “The Oakland A’s pride ourselves on being inclusive,” the team said in a statement released after Maxwell’s demonstration. “We respect and support all of our players’ constitutional rights and freedom of expression.”

Whatever the fallout, kudos to Maxwell for taking a stand. He may be the first to do so in this particular arena, but he likely won’t be the last.

Alex Wilson broke his leg on a 103-MPH comebacker

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This one is brutal. Tigers’ right-handed reliever Alex Wilson was diagnosed with a broken leg after taking a blistering 103.8-MPH line drive off of his right leg during Saturday’s game against the Twins. According to the Detroit News’ Chris McCosky, it’s a non-displaced fibular fracture, but will still warrant an extended recovery period and signal the end of Wilson’s season.

Wilson replaced Drew VerHagen to start the eighth inning and worked a full count against Joe Mauer. Mauer roped an 93.3-MPH fastball back up the middle, where it struck the pitcher on his right calf. While Mauer took first base, Wilson got to his feet and tried to toss a warm-up pitch, but was in too much pain to continue and had to be helped off the field.

Even in a season that isn’t going anywhere in particular, this isn’t how you want it to end. The Tigers have yet to announce a recovery timetable for the 30-year-old reliever, but he won’t return to the mound until 2018. He exited Saturday’s outing with a 4.35 ERA, 2.3 BB/9 and 6.3 SO/9 over 60 innings.

The Tigers currently trail the Twins 10-3 in the bottom of the ninth inning.