Potent quotables: McCutchen's historic night

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“It was just one of those days
where everything worked. I got my pitches, I was able to hit them, and
I was able to hit them out.”

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– Rookie Andrew McCutchen, after becoming the first Pirates player to hit three home runs in a game
since Aramis Ramirez in 2001. He finished 4-for-5 with six RBI on the
night, and through his first 215 at-bats in the majors, the 22-year-old
is batting .293/.349/.488 with six homers, five triples, 31 RBI and
nine stolen bases.

“Am I going to miss San Diego?
Absolutely. I knew this day would come — being traded out — with the
direction the team was going. I’m glad it’s here sooner than later, and
we can get on and start playing baseball and worry about the one thing
on our mind, which is winning.”

– Jake Peavy was introduced to the media
as the newest member of the Chicago White Sox on Saturday. Currently
out of action with an ankle injury, Peavy will begin throwing off a
mound again this week. He doesn’t rule out a late-August return.

“Sometimes you have a No. 3 (hitter)
and need a No. 4 Other times you have a No. 4 and need a No. 3. If you
need a fourth-place hitter and you get Matt Holliday, your lineup
instantly becomes so deep because everyone gets pushed into a spot
that’s more fair. It just happens to be him.”

– Filling out the lineup card has gotten a bit easier for manager Tony LaRussa, as Matt Holliday has hits in each of his first nine games
since joining the Cardinals. He added three more hits, including two
solo homers, in a 3-1 win over the Astros on Saturday night. His .606
batting average (20-for-33) as a Cardinal is utterly ridiculous.

“Most of all, thanks to you, the
fans. This is not just my day. This is you, the fans’ day. … You have
shouted out, ‘Run, Rickey. Run.’ I need your help. Say it one more
time.”

And they happily obliged. Newly-minted Hall of Famer Rickey Henderson had his No. 24 retired by the Athletics on Saturday afternoon.

“Depends on who’s driving. We might
see a spike in beer sales on some of these weekends from a Southern
Indiana group of folks when my buddies come over.”

– Scott Rolen, who was acquired from the Blue Jays on Friday, is thrilled to be at least a little bit closer to home.

Odubel Herrera went 0-for-5 with five strikeouts today

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Did you have a bad day? It’s OK. We all do sometimes. It’s just part of life. Even ballplayers have bad days. Even the good ones.

Odubel Herrera is a good one. He’s only 25, but he’s already got two seasons of above average hitting under his belt. Dude gets on base. He could be a regular for tons of teams, so there’s no shame at all in him having a bad day. And boy howdy did he have a bad day today. He went 0-for-5 with five strikeouts in the Phillies extra innings win against the Rockies.

“I feel that I am making good swings but I’m just missing the pitches,” Herrera said.

Well, that is how strikeouts work.

Four strikeouts in a game is known as a Golden Sombrero. Players don’t strike out five times in a game very often so they don’t have an agreed upon name, but I’ve seen it referred to as the “platinum sombrero,” which seems pretty solid for such a feat. Six is a titanium sombrero or a double platinum sombrero, though there are references to it as a “Horn,” for Sam Horn, who deserves something to be named in his honor. Horn is like Moe Greene — a great man, a man of vision and guts — yet there isn’t even a plaque, or a signpost or a statue of him!

But I digress.

The last time a Phillies player did it was when Pat Burrell K’d five times in September 2008. The Phillies won the World Series that year, of course, so maybe this is an omen. [looks at standings] Or maybe not.

Anyway, get a good night’s sleep tonight, Odubel. Shake it off. Tomorrow is another day.

Rachel Robinson to receive O’Neil Award from the Hall of Fame

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NEW YORK (AP) Rachel Robinson will receive the Buck O’Neil Lifetime Achievement Award from baseball’s Hall of Fame on July 29, the day before this year’s induction ceremony.

She’s the wife of late Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, who broke the major league color barrier in 1947. Rachel Robinson created the Jackie Robinson Foundation in 1973, a year after he husband’s death. Rachel Robinson, who turns 95 in July 19, headed the foundation’s board until 1996.

The O’Neil award was established in 2007 to honor individuals who broaden the game’s appeal and whose character is comparable to that of O’Neil. He played in the Negro Leagues, was a scout for major league baseball teams and helped establish the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City, Missouri.

The award was given to O’Neil in 2008, Roland Hemond in 2011 and Joe Garagiola in 2014.