Take a deep breath before wading into the Manny-Papi commentary

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Whenever major steroids news
breaks, we can be assured of a few things: shock, outrage,
overreaction, and moralizing. I don’t think anything I can say will
head that off at the pass, but let me at least try. This is addressed
mostly to the sports media, but let’s just make it a general “to whom
it may concern:”

You’re not surprised, so please don’t pretend you are. The only
people who will truly surprise you to be associated with steroids are
Derek Jeter, juniors Cal Ripken and Ken Griffey, and dudes like Jason
Tyner and whatnot (though guys like him shouldn’t surprise you).

You’ve not been betrayed, so please don’t claim to be. You enjoyed
the baseball of those years and nothing of value has been taken from
you as a result of recent revelations. While it’s totally legitimate to
be turned off and disappointed and generally depressed about all of
this, if your sense of trust has been so violated by all of this
steroids business that you actually feel the need to claim “betrayal,”
you probably need to examine if you’re still a fan or not.

And you know this one is going to come up like crazy, so let’s be
perfectly clear: the Red Sox’ championship in 2004 is not tainted. At
least no more tainted than the outcome of any other championship won by
any other team in at least the past 20 years, not to mention the awards
and the regular season games and everything else, so please don’t even
go there. Baseball had a steroids problem. Not just the Red Sox, not
just the Yankees, not just the Orioles, Rangers or A’s. As such, to the
extent one uses this latest news as a means of singling out the Sox,
one is simply showing that they see the entire world through rivalries
and not reason.

Now, with that out of the way, you may resume your regularly-scheduled outrage.

Dodgers announce World Series rotation order

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We know Clayton Kershaw will oppose Dallas Keuchel in Game 1 of the World Series. We now know the rest of the Dodgers’ rotation order, per Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times. After Kershaw, it’ll be Rich Hill, then Yu Darvish, followed by Alex Wood.

No surprise, that’s the same order the Dodgers used in the NLCS against the Cubs. Dodger starters combined to post a 2.67 ERA with 31 strikeouts and four walks across 27 innings in the NLCS.

The Astros haven’t yet announced their rotation order, but we can safely assume Justin Verlander will follow Keuchel in Game 2.