Ortiz did whatever it took

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I want to make one thing pretty clear. I’ve just about had it with this
whole steroid controversy, what with it’s secret lists and tainted
records and bloody syringes. I’m having a hard time even caring about
it, because as Craig pointed out below, absolutely nothing surprises us
anymore. We’ve become desensitized to it all.

As baseball fans, we’ve forced ourselves to look the other way just
to move on and enjoy the game we love. Take a look at Mannywood, for
example. Baseball in the late-90s and early 2000s are like a troubled
uncle. Yeah, the dude was pretty messed up for a while, but he keeps
saying he has cleaned himself up. Let’s just give him the benefit of
the doubt, okay? He’ll turn himself around. Really, he will.

That said, it’s quite different when news like this concerns the
team you root for. Even though I’m not a Red Sox fan, seeing David
Ortiz hit that home run against Paul Quantrill in Game Four of the 2004
ALCS was one of my favorite memories as a baseball fan. It was
positively thrilling. But I can’t help but look at Ortiz differently
now. I’ve grown quite tired of reconsidering all the moments I have
enjoyed.

I’m mad at these players, but cognizant that performance enhancing
drugs aren’t so cut and dry. Thus, it’s not so easy to just pass
judgement on them. Even Bob Gibson has said that he might have
considered using PEDs if they had been around during his time. We have
to accept that we are watching and rooting for some very competitive
individuals. Not just against the other team, but in even keeping a
roster spot. This do-whatever-it-takes attitude is what made David
Ortiz from a mere nice player in Minnesota to a prolific slugger in
Boston. As long as there are advantages to be had, players will seek
them out. Period.

Brandon McCarthy wins final spot in Dodgers’ rotation

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We learned on Monday that Hyun-Jin Ryu won one of the final two spots in the Dodgers’ starting rotation. Brandon McCarthy has won the other, Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register reports. Alex Wood was McCarthy’s competitor for the spot.

McCarthy, 33, posted a 4.85 ERA across four appearances spanning 13 innings this spring, yielding seven earned runs on 14 hits and a walk with seven strikeouts. Wood, a southpaw, gave up five earned runs in six innings against the Reds on Tuesday, which might have factored into the decision.

Last season, McCarthy made nine starts and one relief appearance, posting a 4.95 ERA with a 44/26 K/BB ratio in 40 innings. In the event McCarthy falters, the club has Wood as well as Julio Urias and the injured Scott Kazmir as potential replacements.

Yankees re-sign Jon Niese to a minor league deal

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The Yankees have re-signed pitcher Jon Niese to a minor league contract, George A. King III of the New York Post reports. Niese was released on Sunday, but he’ll stick around and provide rotation depth for the Yankees.

Niese had knee surgery last August and got a late start to spring training as a result. In six spring appearances lasting an inning each, the lefty gave up three earned runs on five hits and a walk with five strikeouts.

Niese, a veteran of nine seasons, put up an aggregate 5.50 ERA with an 88/47 K/BB ratio in 121 innings last season between the Pirates and Mets.