Ortiz did whatever it took

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I want to make one thing pretty clear. I’ve just about had it with this
whole steroid controversy, what with it’s secret lists and tainted
records and bloody syringes. I’m having a hard time even caring about
it, because as Craig pointed out below, absolutely nothing surprises us
anymore. We’ve become desensitized to it all.

As baseball fans, we’ve forced ourselves to look the other way just
to move on and enjoy the game we love. Take a look at Mannywood, for
example. Baseball in the late-90s and early 2000s are like a troubled
uncle. Yeah, the dude was pretty messed up for a while, but he keeps
saying he has cleaned himself up. Let’s just give him the benefit of
the doubt, okay? He’ll turn himself around. Really, he will.

That said, it’s quite different when news like this concerns the
team you root for. Even though I’m not a Red Sox fan, seeing David
Ortiz hit that home run against Paul Quantrill in Game Four of the 2004
ALCS was one of my favorite memories as a baseball fan. It was
positively thrilling. But I can’t help but look at Ortiz differently
now. I’ve grown quite tired of reconsidering all the moments I have
enjoyed.

I’m mad at these players, but cognizant that performance enhancing
drugs aren’t so cut and dry. Thus, it’s not so easy to just pass
judgement on them. Even Bob Gibson has said that he might have
considered using PEDs if they had been around during his time. We have
to accept that we are watching and rooting for some very competitive
individuals. Not just against the other team, but in even keeping a
roster spot. This do-whatever-it-takes attitude is what made David
Ortiz from a mere nice player in Minnesota to a prolific slugger in
Boston. As long as there are advantages to be had, players will seek
them out. Period.

Autopsy report reveals morphine, Ambien in Roy Halladay’s system

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Traces of morphine, amphetamine, Prozac and Ambien were found in Roy Halladay’s system at the time of his death, according to the autopsy findings Zachary T. Sampson of the Tampa Bay Times reported Friday. The former Phillies and Blue Jays ace and two-time Cy Young Award winner was killed in a plane crash off the Gulf of Mexico last November. While the exact cause of the incident has not yet been determined, it was a combination of blunt force trauma and drowning that resulted in the 40-year-old’s death.

Further details from the NY Daily News revealed that Halladay sustained a fractured leg and a “subdural hemorrhage, multiple rib fractures, and lung, liver and spleen injuries” during the crash. As for the drugs present in his system, the autopsy report suggests that the presence of morphine could be linked to heroin use, though there’s no clear evidence that he did so.

The toxicology results also determined that Halladay had a blood-alcohol content level of 0.01. A BAC of 0.08 is the legal limit for operating a car, but current FAA regulations prohibit any alcohol consumption for eight hours before operating aircraft. Halladay was both the pilot and sole passenger aboard the plane when it crashed.

Previous statements from the National Transportation Safety Board indicate that the investigation is still ongoing and could take up to two years to resolve.