Fans won't turn on tainted Ortiz, writers will

Leave a comment

As the blog’s resident Red Sox fan, this sucks.

As someone who hates writing about steroids, this really sucks.

The latest leak accusing both Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz of being
among the 104 major leaguers testing positive for PEDs in 2003 didn’t
come as a huge surprise. I sort of made a case
for Ramirez starting in early 2008 in this space when he was suspended
in May, but there was always at least as much reason to believe he was
a long-term cheater. The suspicions about Ortiz always made a lot of
sense. If Ortiz wasn’t such a personable guy, they probably would have
been louder.

The outing of Ortiz is just another step on the road to, if not
respectability, then at least tolerance for steroids. Dodger fans still
love Ramirez. Yankees fans have played forgive and forget with every
homer from Jason Giambi and now Alex Rodriguez. The Red Sox had been
remarkably unstained by steroid talk, even to the point of having fewer
minor leaguers suspended than any other franchise. But it was always a
given that cheaters played a role in the 2004 championship and likely
the one in 2007 as well. Red Sox fans have loved Ortiz too long to
start hating him now. They’ll cheer every homer just like they always
have.

At this point, it certainly seems as though the writers are the ones
with the biggest grudge against steroid users. In most cases, it’s the
same writers who were in better position than anyone to expose steroid
use in the 1990s and failed miserably. The fans are largely sick of the
topic and want to move on. MLB itself would certainly like to move on.

However, one thing that’s going to have to happen before we can
truly move on is the release of the 2003 list. It’s disgusting that
unethical lawyers are letting a name or two slip at a time. The whole
list is going to eventually come out and the sooner the better.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

Mitchell Layton/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.