Vin Scully to go one more year; Plaschke, sadly, not going anywhere

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A lot of folks thought Vin Scully was going to retire after this season, but he’s got one more in him, he says:

Vin Scully, thought to be retiring this winter after 60 seasons,
said this week he is planning on coming back for one more summer.
Scully, 81, said if he continues to feel well he will work past his
landmark year and retire after the 2010 season.

“God willing, I will probably come back for one more year,” Scully
said in a phone interview. “At this moment, my health is excellent, and
I’m leaning toward one more year.”

And then retire?

“Yes, that makes sense,” he said.

The L.A. Times’ Bill Plaschke, of course, gets this all wrong,
going on about how the Dodgers need to take the next 15 months to think
really, really hard and come up with some sort of special, spectacular
sendoff. After describing a tribute video the team has been playing on
the scoreboard and how Scully himself, while honored, felt rather
uncomfortable with the whole thing, Plaschke says this:

This was the Dodgers’ first attempt at a farewell, and it was a good
one, but now it’s time to get serious. If they could build a Mannywood
in a couple of weeks, surely they can use the next few months to figure
out a way to permanently honor Scully in a way that no Dodger has been
honored before . . .

. . . Turn this Dodgers monument into a statue. Sculpt Scully
sitting in a booth, with a microphone and headsets and his ever-present
scorebook. Fill the desk with dozens of ports where fans can plug in
headphones and listen to tapes of Scully’s calls. What greater tribute
than having Dodgers fans gathered at his feet as one, listening to his
voice forever? Place the sculpture just beyond the Dodger Stadium
center-field fence, in the area currently populated by autograph booths
and fans chasing batting practice fly balls. Lay down some grass like
they do at Yankee Stadium for the center-field Monument Park. Call it

Apart from the fact that Scully himself is probably reading that this
morning and spitting coffee across the table due to just how
horrifyingly opposed it is to everything he’s ever stood for as a
broadcaster, it’s a fabulous idea.

The Yankees Wild Card Game roster is set

Luis Severino
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Wild Card teams get to set their roster for the one-and-done game and then reset it for the Division Series if they advance. As such, you sometimes see some weirdness with the wild card roster. The Yankees, who just set theirs for tonight’s game, are no exception.

Masahiro Tanaka will be tonight’s starter, but Luis Severino, also a starter, will be around as well in case Tanaka gets knocked out early and they need more innings. In all, the Yankees are carrying nine pitchers and three catchers. In addition, they have Rob Refsnyder, Slade Heathcott, and pinch-runner Rico Noel as bench players. In case you forgot, pinch running can matter a lot in a Wild Card Game.

Jarrod Dyson Gif

Either way, it beats having a regular season-type roster with 13 pitchers or something. I mean, if you’re using more than nine pitchers, you ain’t winning anyway.

Here’s the whole roster:

CC Sabathia’s bad weekend in Baltimore made him choose rehab

sabathia getty

It was inevitable that someone would report on what, specifically, was going on with CC Sabathia in the run up to his decision to go into rehab yesterday. And today we have that story, at least in the broad strokes, from the New York Post.

Speaking to an anonymous source close to Sabathia, the Post reports that the Yankees’ starter more or less went on a bender from Thursday into Friday and continued on to Saturday, which resulted in his Sunday afternoon phone call to Brian Cashman in which he said he needed help.

Notable detail: Sabathia is referred to as “not a big drinker” in the story. Which is something worth thinking about when you think of others who have trouble with alcohol. It’s not always about massive or constant consumption. It’s about the person’s relationship with substances that is the real problem. Many who drink a good deal are totally fine. Many who don’t drink much do so in problematic ways and patterns. For this reason, and many others, it’s useful to avoid engaging in cliches and stereotypes of addicts.