Nats Park: an increasingly bad deal for D.C. taxpayers

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I’ve long been opposed to the use of public monies to finance Major
League ballparks. For one thing, these teams are owned by billionaires,
almost all of the revenues a park brings goes right back to the team,
not the city, and I don’t think local government should be in the
business of giving such handouts to billionaires. For another thing, I
don’t know too many cities who have been so flush with cash in the past
several decades that they couldn’t have used the hundreds of millions
they’re spending on the ballpark for something more important. Finally,
even if you’re all for a city giving millions it doesn’t have to
billionaires, the details of these ballpark deals are always shady, and
the true cost to the taxpayers only becomes evident years after all of
the initial hoopla and rosy projections.

In light of all of that, this news regarding Nationals Park in Washington doesn’t surprise me in the least:

Mayor Adrian M. Fenty is planning to divert millions of dollars from
the ballpark tax to reduce the city’s deficit. The Ballpark Revenue
Fund is intended to pay down the debt on Nationals Park. But Fenty’s
revised 2010 budget shifts $50 million from it to the general fund over
the next four years.

And it’s not as if the ballpark debt is going to go away. It’s now
simply going to cost a strapped city even more to service, thereby
raising the ultimate price of the Lerner family’s new toy box/cash
machine even higher than was projected when the place was built.

I love baseball. For the most part I love the new ballparks. There
is no escaping the fact, however, that these ballparks represent
horrible, horrible deals for tax payers.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

Bob Levey/Getty Images
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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

Justin K. Aller/Getty Images
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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.