Josh Willingham is untouchable? Really?

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Jeff Fletcher of AOL Fanhouse cites a source as saying the Nationals were shopping Josh Willingham two weeks ago, but now he is “untouchable.”

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Yes. Stick with me — the same guy who the Nats wouldn’t give more than
a sniff of playing time just a month ago. Sure, Willingham has been
incredible in July, batting .329/.423/.683 with seven homers and 23
RBI, including two grand slams against the Brewers on Monday, but isn’t
this a perfect opportunity to sell high? Under team control for two
more seasons, Willingham might be the best trade chip the Nationals
currently have on their roster, especially when you compare him to an
impending free agent like Nick Johnson. Now 30 years old, Willingham
doesn’t figure to be around when (if?) the Nationals are ready to
compete.

You hate to say this, but perhaps Willingham is motivated to play well right now because he actually wants
to get traded to a contender? You know, a real light at the end of tunnel
sort of scenario. If we’ve entered a world where Josh Willingham is
untouchable, then give Jeff Francoeur a contract extension.

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

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Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.