Bud puts the brakes on the Pete Rose reinstatement talk

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All of that fun we had the other day with Pete Rose seems to have petered out, as Bud Selig is now telling people that he’s not going to pardon the hit king. The Dayton Daily News’ Hal McCoy thinks that someone got played:

I can sniff exactly what happened. It has happened to me. I wrote a
story once and the next day Commissioner Selig was on the phone
personally, straightening me out.

Madden is a close friend of mine and I respect him immensely. He is
on the writers ballot for the Spink Award and Hall of Fame induction
next year. He attends the Hall of Fame ceremonies every year and talks
to all the Hall of Famers.

Somebody steered him wrong. I noticed there were no quotes from
Selig on the story that he is considering Rose’s reinstatement. Madden
talked about Hank Aaron backing Rose, along with Joe Morgan and Frank
Robinson. Somebody spoon-fed him false information – maybe even some of
Rose’s people, who have been known to do that.

Anyway, I suspect Selig called Madden on Monday and set the record straight.

Isn’t just as likely — and in total keeping with his past habits —
that Bud Selig was sending up a trial balloon to see how a
reinstatement would play? And that, given what, from where I’m sitting
anyway, looks like a decidedly anti-reinstatement sentiment, decided to
walk it back?

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.