Omar Minaya is out of control

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As was widely reported late yesterday afternoon, Omar Minaya went off the deep end during his Tony Bernazard press conference,
strongly implying that The New York Daily News’ Adam Rubin’s reporting
of the Bernazard shenanigans was motivated by Rubin being frustrated
after not getting a job with the Mets for which he lobbied, or wanting
to get Bernazard fired to take his job, or something along those lines.
At least that’s what I took from it. However you slice it, it was
bizarre. Go watch it here if you missed it.

Rubin was livid during the presser — thanks for the split screen SNY! — and today he responds:

As I told the reporters who descended upon me after Minaya left the
press conference, I have never, ever, asked Omar Minaya for a job. Or
even career advice. Frankly, I’ve never been very close to him. What I
have done, and what Mets COO Jeff Wilpon acknowledged later yesterday,
is ask Wilpon for “career advice.” My question: Is it even remotely
feasible for a baseball writer to get into an administrative job with a
team – any team – down the road and what would I need for that to be
achieved?

Wilpon once invited me to his office at Citi Field for an advisory session. I never took him up on it.

Some people are complaining about Rubin’s potential ethical lapses
in all of this, but I don’t have much of a problem with him talking
generally with the Mets about his career prospects, if that’s all he
did. It’s a tough world out there, and the kinds of journalistic
integrity principles people cite in such situations – you can’t
possibly talk to the people you cover about anything! — seem kind of
quaint in a world where everyone is hustling to stay alive all the damn
time. Besides, this is tabloid journalism we’re talking about here. If
what they’re reporting is true — and Rubin’s stories about Bernazard
have not been questioned on that front — I really don’t care what
Rubin’s career development plan looks like. And even if that truly
matters, there is nothing short of Omar Minaya’s insane ramblings to
support the notion that Rubin wrote what he wrote out of spite or
anything. The Bernazard stories were legit news, and he got the stories
right. That, as they say, should be the end of the story.

The bigger question here is why anyone lets Omar Minaya near a
microphone. Or near the controls of a baseball team for that matter.
Bernazard was his guy, and look how well that turned out. The Mets are
his team, and look how good that’s going. Rather than take
responsibility for any of that, he’s setting the phasers for “paranoid”
and going out and attacking reporters.

If I worked for the Mets’ media relations department, I’d be
hesitant to knock down the press conference table this morning, because
by all rights there should be another one very, very soon.

2016 postseason playoff shares announced

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OXON HILL, Md — There used to be a time when postseason money was bigger than most players’ actual salaries. Winning a pennant in baseball’s Golden Age was great for its own sake, but if you were one of the guys who hung around with, say, the Yankees for a long time like Frank Crosetti, the money was basically life-changing.

That’s not the case any longer, but the money is still pretty good, as evidenced by the postseason shares handed out for this past postseason, which were just announced and are set forth below.

Shares come from the “players’ pool,” which calculated by taking 50 percent of the gate receipts from the Wild Card Games; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first three games of the Division Series; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the League Championship Series; and 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the World Series.  The players’ pool is divided among the 10 Postseason Clubs. The 2016 players’ pool was a record total of $76,627,827.09. Last year it was $69,882,149.26.

The clubs themselves decide how many shares to allocate, with the players making decisions regarding which part timers, cup-of-coffee callups, staffers, etc. get. They also have the ability to hand out straight cash awards in whatever amount they want as opposed to a percentage cut of the postseason money.

The breakdown:

  • Chicago Cubs (Share of Players’ Pool: $27,586,017.75; value of each of full share: $368,871.59) – The Cubs issued 66 full shares, a total of 8.7 partial shares and four cash awards;
  • Cleveland Indians (Share of Players’ Pool: $18,390,678.50; value of each of full share: $261,804.65) – The Indians issued 60 full shares, a total of 8.75 partial shares and 16 cash awards.
  • Los Angeles Dodgers (Share of Players’ Pool: $9,195,339.25; value of each of full share: $123,741.24) – The Dodgers issued 65 full shares, a total of 8.285 partial shares and 20 cash awards.
  • Toronto Blue Jays (Share of Players’ Pool: $9,195,339.25; value of each of full share: $123,045.09) – The Blue Jays issued 66 full shares, a total of 7.75 partial shares and 15 cash awards.
  • Boston Red Sox (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $33,761.22) – The Red Sox issued 61 full shares, a total of 10.686 partial shares and 14 cash awards.
  • San Francisco Giants (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $36,443.03) – The Giants issued 57 full shares, a total of 10.5 partial shares and nine cash awards.
  • Texas Rangers (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $38,422.69) – The Rangers issued 54 full shares, a total of 10.19 partial shares and seven cash awards.
  • Washington Nationals (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $35,442.68) – The Nationals issued 60 full shares, a total of 10.209 partial shares and one cash award.
  • Baltimore Orioles (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,149,417.41; value of each of full share: $18,351.02) – The Orioles issued 52 full shares, a total of 8.36 partial shares and 30 cash awards.
  • New York Mets (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,149,417.41; value of each of full share: $17,951.65) – The Mets issued 51 full shares, a total of 12.75 partial shares and five cash awards.

 

Cubs-Royals reportedly agree to the Wade Davis-Jorge Soler deal

KANSAS CITY, MO - APRIL 3:  Wade Davis #17 of the Kansas City Royals throws against the New York Mets at Kauffman Stadium on April 3, 2016 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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It was rumored to be close last night but now Bob Nightengale of USA Today is reporting that the Cubs and Royals have agreed to the Wade Davis for Jorge Soler deal. Jeff Passan of Yahoo first reported that the deal was close last night. It’s not a completely done deal as the official announcement is pending physicals, but an announcement could come this morning. Ken Rosenthal reports that, assuming it gets done, it will be a straight-up deal, with no other players involved.

Davis has been one of the most dominant relievers in baseball over the past three seasons, posting a 1.18 ERA with 47 saves and a 234/59 K/BB ratio in 182.2 innings. He did, however, miss a lot of time in 2016 — basically the month of August — due to arm trouble and expecting him to be the circa 2014 Wade Davis is probably unrealistic. He’s owed $10 million for 2017 and can become a free agent after the 2017 season. He’ll fill the void left by the departing Aroldis Chapman as Joe Maddon and the World Series champs’ closer.

Soler, who will be 25 when the 2017 season begins, hit .238/.333/.436 with 12 homers and 36 RBI in 86 games last season. He strikes out a lot but takes walks t00 and has shown some good power in short bursts. He’s the sort of player who one could easilsy see putting things together to become a solid regular, which makes him a decent return for giving up a closer in his walk year.