What they're saying about Mark Buehrle's perfect game

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The blogosphere reacts just as much to DeWayne Wise’s catch as they do Buehrle’s perfect game:

Sports by Brooks:
“Say, remember a couple days ago when White Sox fans were whipped up in
a lather about Ozzie Guillen’s decision to demote Brian Anderson
instead of DeWayne Wise in order to make room for Carlos Quentin?
Remember how people had gone so far as to claim racism in emails to
Guillen? Well, it turns out that was far more of a consequential
decision than anybody could have imagined . . . Maybe we should just
let Ozzie make the personnel decisions in peace from here on out,
folks.”

On that same note, South Side Sox says: “would BA have had it?”

And the Sun Times blog too: “That’s why D. Wise is on the team. The BA lovers can now shutup.”

Rob Neyer:
“Well, Mark Buehrle has thrown two more no-hitters than Roger Clemens,
Greg Maddux, and Tom Glavine. Combined. Does that mean Buehrle’s a Hall
of Famer someday, too? Hardly.”

Danny Knobler, CBS Sports:
“With a week to go before the July 31 deadline, the White Sox were
supposedly focused on starting pitching and center field. This
afternoon, sure enough, the White Sox were focused on a starting
pitcher and a center fielder. Mark Buehrle. Dewayne Wise. Who needs a
trade?”

Bronx Banter: “Why baseball matters: Because on any given day something great can happen.”

Over the Monster:
“It would have been cool if Buehrle had pitched his perfect game in a
Red Sox uniform. Unfortunately, knowing our porous defense, it probably
would’ve been a 10-run rout for Tampa.”

I think the most telling thing about all of this is how
underrepresented the White Sox are in the blogosphere. If this had
happened on any number of other teams I would have had to sift through
dozens of blog posts about it. As it is this, and a whole bunch of
short “Mark Buehrle threw a perfecto; neat” posts is all there really
is this morning. Maybe that’s not a bad thing. Overanalysis can be a
drag sometimes, and what Buehrle — and DeWise — did kind of speaks
for itself, ya know?

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: