What they're saying about Mark Buehrle's perfect game

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The blogosphere reacts just as much to DeWayne Wise’s catch as they do Buehrle’s perfect game:

Sports by Brooks:
“Say, remember a couple days ago when White Sox fans were whipped up in
a lather about Ozzie Guillen’s decision to demote Brian Anderson
instead of DeWayne Wise in order to make room for Carlos Quentin?
Remember how people had gone so far as to claim racism in emails to
Guillen? Well, it turns out that was far more of a consequential
decision than anybody could have imagined . . . Maybe we should just
let Ozzie make the personnel decisions in peace from here on out,
folks.”

On that same note, South Side Sox says: “would BA have had it?”

And the Sun Times blog too: “That’s why D. Wise is on the team. The BA lovers can now shutup.”

Rob Neyer:
“Well, Mark Buehrle has thrown two more no-hitters than Roger Clemens,
Greg Maddux, and Tom Glavine. Combined. Does that mean Buehrle’s a Hall
of Famer someday, too? Hardly.”

Danny Knobler, CBS Sports:
“With a week to go before the July 31 deadline, the White Sox were
supposedly focused on starting pitching and center field. This
afternoon, sure enough, the White Sox were focused on a starting
pitcher and a center fielder. Mark Buehrle. Dewayne Wise. Who needs a
trade?”

Bronx Banter: “Why baseball matters: Because on any given day something great can happen.”

Over the Monster:
“It would have been cool if Buehrle had pitched his perfect game in a
Red Sox uniform. Unfortunately, knowing our porous defense, it probably
would’ve been a 10-run rout for Tampa.”

I think the most telling thing about all of this is how
underrepresented the White Sox are in the blogosphere. If this had
happened on any number of other teams I would have had to sift through
dozens of blog posts about it. As it is this, and a whole bunch of
short “Mark Buehrle threw a perfecto; neat” posts is all there really
is this morning. Maybe that’s not a bad thing. Overanalysis can be a
drag sometimes, and what Buehrle — and DeWise — did kind of speaks
for itself, ya know?

Adam Eaton sustains leg injury after tripping over first base

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Nationals’ outfielder Adam Eaton was carried off the field after stumbling over first base on Friday night. In the ninth inning of the Nationals’ 7-5 loss to the Mets, Eaton appeared to catch his ankle on the bag as he ran out an infield single, suffering a leg injury on the fall. He was unable to put pressure on his left leg after the play and required assistance by two of the Nationals’ athletic trainers as he exited the field.

Eaton is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Saturday, but Nationals’ manager Dusty Baker told reporters that it “doesn’t look too good.” It’s the first significant leg injury the outfielder has sustained since 2014, when he went on the 15-day disabled list with a hamstring strain. He’ll likely be replaced by Michael Taylor in center field for the next couple of games, though that could be a temporary fix as the Nationals seek a better solution during Eaton’s recovery process.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.