Holliday for Wallace makes perfect sense

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The Cardinals thought their offense was set when they acquired Mark
DeRosa from the Indians, but DeRosa injured his wrist and neither Chris
Duncan nor Rick Ankiel proved able to shake lingering injuries that
have left them unable to contribute offensively. Now the team has to
decide whether it’s worth mortgaging even more of the future to bring
in Matt Holliday from the Athletics.

The only return that makes sense for the A’s is 2008 first-round
pick Brett Wallace, a player Oakland passed over with the 12th
selection last year. They chose Jemile Weeks, Rickie’s younger brother,
instead, leaving Wallace for the Cardinals at No. 13.

The Wallace selection for St. Louis seemed awfully similar to
Milwaukee’s pick of Matt LaPorta the previous season. Even if the
player wasn’t a great fit for the team, picking the potent college bat
provided a great piece of trade bait. LaPorta, of course, was sent to
Cleveland for CC Sabathia last year. Now Wallace could go for another
superstar in his walk year.

The big factor that all of the teams are weighing these days is
draft picks. The Cardinals wouldn’t be desperate enough to give up six
years of Wallace for 2 1/2 months of Holliday straight up. But Wallace
for Holliday and two high draft picks? That’s likely worth doing.
Similarly, the A’s can’t settle for a prospect less than Wallace. Even
if they won’t have anything to play for in August and September, they
value the picks greatly.

Wallace is made expendable in St. Louis because of his glove. Most
projected him to move off third base in the pros, and while he’s still
playing the hot corner at the moment, he doesn’t have many convinced
that he’ll last at the position. Fortunately, he should possess the bat
to carry first. His .298/.351/.431 line in 61 games since being moved
up to Triple-A is hardly awe-inspiring, but it’s pretty good for
someone in his first pro season. He projects as a legitimate .300
hitter with 20-25 homer ability.

Holliday’s addition would give the Cardinals one of the game’s best lineups:

2B Skip Schumaker
3B Mark DeRosa
1B Albert Pujols
LF Matt Holliday
RF Ryan Ludwick
C Yadier Molina
CF Colby Rasmus
SS Brendan Ryan

The idea of using Troy Glaus as an outfielder would die, but he
probably wasn’t going to be an option as a regular anyway. He could be
the game’s scariest pinch-hitter come playoff time and maybe an
occasional option at third. Rick Ankiel, Khalil Greene and Julio Lugo
can join him on the game’s most expensive bench.

Since the price tag for Holliday doesn’t approach what the Jays
would want for Roy Halladay, I think he’s the right pickup for St.
Louis. It’d leave them talent left over to go get a reliever if they
desire, and they might even be able to talk Oakland into kicking in
some cash.

Theo Epstein on sportswriters: “The life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself…”

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 07:  Chicago Cubs general manager Theo Epstein stands on the field during batting practice before the game between the Chicago Cubs and the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field on October 7, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Rick Morissey of the Chicago Sun-Times published an article on Sunday giving a bit of insight into Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein. When Epsten was younger, he dabbled in sportswriting, but quickly realized the trade wasn’t for him.

As Morissey details, when Epstein was 19 years old writing for Yale’s student newspaper, he wrote an article suggesting the school’s football coach should be fired during what would become a 3-7 season. Epstein was told during the meeting that one writer would defend the coach and one would call for his job. “It was a lesson in the way that the world of journalism sometimes works. It was an eye-opener for me. I regret it, and I’ve happily moved on.”

Epstein continued, “I realized I didn’t want to be a sportswriter when I was interning with the Orioles back in ’92, ’93, ’94. I did do a lot of media-relations stuff, and I saw that the life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself in the press box, go back to the hotel bar. Not to generalize.” He added, “But I really respect writing and respect sportswriters.”

He’s not wrong, and he seems to have found his calling as a front office executive. His Cubs are back in the World Series for the first time since 1945.

Jason Kipnis injured his ankle celebrating the pennant with Francisco Lindor

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Jose Ramirez #11, Francisco Lindor #12, Jason Kipnis #22 and Mike Napoli #26 of the Cleveland Indians celebrate after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays with a score of 4 to 2 in game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images

Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis tweeted on Sunday, “Got a little too close to [Francisco Lindor] during the celebration!! Freak accident but should be good to go by Tuesday! #cantkeepmeoutofthisgame!”

Per MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian, manager Terry Francona said Kipnis is dealing with a low ankle sprain, but he’s expected to be ready to go when the World Series begins on Tuesday. Kipnis went through fielding drills on Sunday.

Kipnis is hitting .167/.219/.367 with a pair of homers and four RBI in eight games this postseason.