The Red Sox number-retirement policy is a joke

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The Red Sox are going to retire Jim Rice’s number. Fair enough. He fits the criteria the Sox have articulated for the honor: (1) Election to the National Baseball Hall of Fame; and (2) at least 10 years played with the Red Sox.

Can someone then tell me why Wade Boggs doesn’t have his number
retired? He had 11 seasons with the Sox, made the Hall of Fame, and was
a heck of a lot better player than Jim Rice ever was. The only answer
anyone has ever given me is that they have an unwritten rule that you
had to have finished your career with Boston as well. If that’s the
case then, it’s (a) been broken already with Carlton Fisk; and (b) it’s
patently stupid. If the Yankees had such a rule Melky Cabrera could
wear Babe Ruth’s number three given that he ended his career with the
Braves. If the Braves had it, Dale Murphy never would have been able to
wear his number 3 — Ruth had it, natch — and Jeff Francoeur would
have been able to sport Hank Aaron’s 44. I don’t think we’d need to
worry about anyone wearing Francoeur’s number for obvious reasons.

In light of all of that I can only assume that the Red Sox haven’t
retired Boggs’ number out of spite because he went and got a ring with
the Yankees. Which I suppose would be a good reason if Babe Ruth hadn’t
won a title with the Sox before he came to New York.

Man the whole Yankees-Sox thing is idiotic.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.