The Hall of Fame: it's all about the money

Leave a comment

Next time you hear Hall of Famers spout off about how the steroids cheats should be kept out, keep in mind that it may very well be more than the alleged integrity of the institution that they’re
protecting. Being inducted into the Hall of Fame can mean lots and lots of cash:

On the day Mr. Gossage’s election was announced, in mid-January
2007, I spent several hours with him and his agent, Andrew Levy. Their
cellphones never stopped ringing. Mr. Gossage bantered with George
Brett, Joe Torre and other baseball friends who called to offer
congratulations. Meanwhile, Mr. Levy furiously fielded business offers.
“Until now, he’s been getting between $7,500 and $10,000 per speech,”
Mr. Levy told me. “Today, his price just tripled.” The Goose had laid a
golden egg . . .

. . . In recent years the money pot has grown as the Hall of Fame,
which produces and markets its own line of merchandise, has been forced
to give 30% of the profits to its inductees. According to Marvin
Miller, very likely the world’s greatest expert on baseball economics,
this helps explain why the Veterans Committee, composed of Hall of
Famers, consistently refuses to exercise its mandate to elect
previously overlooked old-timers. “Nobody wants to dilute the value of
his stock,” Mr. Miller told me.

And it’s not as if it’s only the people on the inside who are treating
this like a business. As the article notes, the most famous of those on
the outside looking in — Ron Santo, Bert Blyleven, the estate of
Shoeless Joe Jackson and Davy Concepcion — all have what amounts to
professional lobbying and P.R. representation working for them.
Jackson’s heirs, the article tells us, can expect a boost of of a half
million bucks a year in marketing opportunities if and when he’s ever
inducted. Joe Morgan isn’t even the craziest guy out there campaigning
for Concepcion: “The government of Venezuela hired Washington lobbyist
Tim Gay to mount a Hall of Fame campaign for Hugo Chávez’s favorite
shortstop, Dave Concepcion.”

Given this weekend’s Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, you’re going
to hear a ton about this allegedly august institution. About who is
outside looking in. About who deserves to be there and who doesn’t.
About how allowing Barry Bonds and his fellow travellers in would
simply corrupt the place. Don’t take it seriously. Because while the
Hall of Fame is a great museum, the Hall of Fame induction game is a
business like anything else, and it’s owed just as much reverence as
Wal-Mart, Google, Congress or any other useful yet ultimately
self-interested institution.

(Thanks to Neate Sager for the link)

Carlos Santana left last night’s game with back tightness

Getty Images
1 Comment

Andrew Miller leaving last night’s Indians-Red Sox game got all the press, but the Indians lost another key player in the game as well: Carlos Santana. He was forced to leave after going 0-for-3. There was no followup announcement after the game, so he’s likely being reevaluated.

Santana is hitting .250/.355/.446 on the year, but he’s been pretty hot of late, hitting .375 with a couple of homers in the past week.

Bruce Bochy calls the Phillies Hector Neris “an idiot”

Getty Images
1 Comment

On Sunday Phillies reliever Hector Neris hit Buster Posey in the back. Posey thought it was intentional and, after the game, said  “I guess he didn’t feel he could get me out.”

Was it intentional? There’s a lot to suggest it wasn’t. Mostly the game situation: the Phillies had a two-run lead, but Neris was called in with two men on base and hitting Posey put the tying run in scoring position, which is not something a reliever usually wants to do with his first pitch of the game. Beyond that, while Neris and former Giant Eduardo Nunez had a bit of an incident earlier this season (Neris blew a kiss at Nunez after some words), there was no bad blood between Posey and Neris. When the pitch hit Posey in the back Neris seemed to react negatively, as if he didn’t mean to do it, and said as much after the game.

Oh well, it’s not uncommon for guys who get hit to be angry about it, even if it was uninentional. It’s not uncommon for guys who hit someone to say it was an accident, even if it wasn’t. You can file this one in the “unsolved” drawer forever, where it will be forgotten.

Or at least you could until Bruce Bochy weighed in yesterday, after the Phillies left town:

“It wasn’t just a little inside. The same guy — I’ll say it, he’s an idiot. He showed it in Philadelphia when he was having words with (Eduardo) Nuñez, so I think that caused the radar to be up a little bit on what happened there. It wasn’t a glancing blow. It was at his ribs and on the backside of his ribs. I’m not surprised. I would have been upset, too. You never know for sure, but it certainly didn’t look good. Anyway, that’s behind us.”

I guess it was, anyway. The Giants don’t face the Phillies again this year, but remember it for next year.