Quote of the Day: 'I can't see the point in coming back'

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Brett Tomko, on being designated for assignment by the Yankees:

I don’t think I got a fair shot. I pitched great in spring training
and didn’t make the team. I pitched great in the minors, got called up
and didn’t get much of a chance. I understand other guys are pitching
great. But it could have been different. I can’t see the point in
coming back.

Obviously no one likes to be fired and I’m sure that Tomko wasn’t used
optimally by the Yankees, but the notion of “a fair shot” sort of goes
out the window when talking about a 36-year-old pitcher with nearly
1,800 career innings in the majors. Plus, who cares if someone “pitched
great in spring training” and “pitched great in the minors” if they’ve
posted a better-than-average ERA exactly once in the last dozen
seasons?

Tomko has earned over $20 million despite being a mediocre back-of-the-rotation starter or long reliever for his entire career,
the Yankees called him up in May and used him as a mop-up man for six
weeks, he allowed 12 runs in 21 innings to make him 7-21 with a 5.76
ERA over the past three seasons, and now they’re letting him go. “But
it could have been different” is just about the least accurate way to
describe the situation.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.