The Nats are nowhere near signing Strasburg

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Last week Stephen Strasburg was lamenting the fact that he hadn’t heard from the Nationals. Seems that nothing has really changed:

The Washington Nationals are not on pace to sign top overall draft
pick Stephen Strasburg by the Aug. 17 deadline, a source close to the
negotiations told ESPN’s Pedro Gomez on Tuesday . . . The source said
that the Nats have had an ongoing dialogue with Strasburg’s adviser,
Scott Boras, but have made no offer other than the mandatory minor
league tender that all clubs must make to their picks within 10 days of
the draft.

As I said last week, the Nats shouldn’t cave in to Boras, but if they
can’t get this kid signed or at least make a strong, strong effort to
do so, the seven Nats fans that are left are totally going to bolt.

UPDATE: The Washington Times is calling the “no progress report” bunk,
though that’s coming from a team source that has every reason to paint
a rosier picture than actually exists. Of course, if Pedro Gomez’s
“source close to the negotiations” is with the Boras camp, then his
source has every reason to paint a more gloomy picture than actually
exists.

Damn, I can’t believe it’s only been a day and I’ve already
forgotten that “don’t believe half of what you see and none of what you
hear” rule.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.