With deadline looming, Halladay isn't the only ace available

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Roy Halladay is obviously dominating the rumor mill
right now as fans across the country assess their favorite team’s
chances of landing one of the truly elite pitchers in baseball.

However, Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reminds everyone that another ace may also be available with the trading deadline now just 10 days away.

In fact, take a look at how our mystery man compares to Halladay since the beginning of last season:

               GS     IP     ERA     W     L     AVG     OBP     SLG
Halladay 51 378 2.76 31 14 .241 .275 .347
Player X 51 359 2.83 27 12 .265 .301 .364

Player X is Cliff Lee of the Indians, who won the Cy Young award
last season and has a 3.31 ERA in 20 starts this year. Lee’s potential
availability doesn’t generate the same number of headlines as Halladay
because his track record prior to 2008 isn’t as good and terrible run
support has him sporting an ugly 5-9 record, but since the start of
last season he has the third-best ERA in baseball behind Halladay and
Tim Lincecum.

Both pitchers are signed through next season, but Lee is 15 months
younger and will make just $8 million in 2010 compared to $15.75
million for Halladay. All things being equal I’d certainly choose
Halladay over Lee, but the gap between them hasn’t been as big as most
people seem to think and given the likely costs involved in acquiring
each player Lee could prove to be a better target.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.