The Pirates are jerking Sanchez, Wilson and their fans around

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On Friday
I relayed the news of the contract offers given by the Pirates to
Freddy Sanchez and Jack Wilson. When I did, I said “I can’t recall an
instance of Pirates’ GM Neal Huntington playing games with players.”
Well, here’s an instance of it:

The Pirates yesterday pulled back their contract extension offers to
Jack Wilson and Freddy Sanchez and, though they remain open to new
negotiations, there was no indication any are forthcoming. “That time
has come and gone,” general manager Neal Huntington said of the offers’
lifespan. “They feel like we’re awfully light both in years and
dollars. In our minds, the conversations are at a standstill . . .
Typically, in a negotiation, you get a counter-offer. That’s how
conversations continue. We’ve not gotten that to this point.”

I love how Huntington is trying to make Wilson and Sanchez sound like
the bad guys here. But listen to Wilson: “Answer me this: How can we
respond with counter-offers when we were told that those were
take-it-or-leave-it offers? How do you counter that?” And then listen
to Huntington again:

“A year ago, I was an idiot for extending Freddy for $6 million. And
now, I’m an idiot for not being willing to give him a heck of a lot
more than that. In Jack’s case, he has played terrific defense for us,
maybe the best of his career. But this is the fourth of five years that
he’s been a below-average league bat for his position. So, we’ve got to
be realistic in our evaluations.”

Except that, according to the wire reports, he wasn’t offering “a heck of a lot more than that”:

Sanchez was offered $10 million over two seasons, a deal contingent
upon him shelving the $8.4 million he will be owed in 2010 if he makes
600 plate appearances this season. Wilson, the most tenured Pirates
player with nine seasons in uniform, was offered $8 million over two
years – or less than his club option of $8.4 million for next season

To sum up: Sanchez was given an option by Neal Huntington that rewarded
good consistent play, and he has delivered it. The new offer he was
given, however, takes that away and stands to pay him far less than he
can expect to get over the next two years regardless. Wilson is also
being asked to drop his option and take a pay cut, all while being
bad-mouthed by his boss. Neither of the offers ever stood a chance of
being accepted and Huntington had to know it.

Not that they’re necessarily terrible offers on some objective
level. In fact, they probably represent decent approximations of each
players’ value going forward. The problem, though, isn’t the offers
themselves. It’s the way in which they were communicated: publicly, and
in such a way as to put Sanchez and Wilson on the spot and to make them
sound like bad guys when they were rejected.

A GM in Huntington’s position sometimes has to make unpopular moves,
such as parting with popular players like Sanchez and Wilson. He should
have the guts to simply do so, however, rather than make a big phony
show of wanting to keep them in an effort to win the P.R. game.

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.

Carlos Santana in left field? Sure, OK.

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 15:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a home run in the second inning against J.A. Happ #33 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game two of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 15, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that Indians First Baseman/DH Carlos Santana shagged some flyballs in left field during the Indians’ workout today.

Sure, why not? Santana has played one game in the outfield in his major league career and that was over four years ago, but the Indians will have to play in Chicago without the DH, meaning either losing Santana’s bat or that of Mike Napoli.

It would be up to Terry Francona to decide if that happens, but ultimately I don’t think he’ll make it real and, rather, will just forget about it, because Santana’s defense out there would in no way be smooth.

I’m sorry. I’m sick today and I’m on a lot of cold medicine.