Kemp building case as baseball's most underrated player

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Matt Kemp went 3-for-3 with a walk and the go-ahead homer in the eighth
inning yesterday afternoon, scoring all four times he reached base as
the Dodgers won 4-3. In performing his one-man show Kemp became the first player since Dick McAuliffe in 1968 to score at least four times while accounting for all of his team’s runs.

What makes Kemp’s feat particularly noteworthy is that he scored four
times despite batting seventh in the Dodgers’ lineup, so he had Brad
Ausmus and the pitcher’s spot behind him. Only five players in the history of baseball
have batted more times than Ausmus while posting a lower adjusted OPS+,
but last night he twice drove in Kemp with doubles before Kemp later
scored on back-to-back errors and his own homer.

Kemp is now batting .321/.385/.500 with 30 extra-base hits and 20 steals in 90 games, rates as the third-best defensive outfielder in the NL according to Ultimate Zone Rating, and ranks third in the league
in runs above replacement level behind only Albert Pujols and Chase
Utley. Oh, and Kemp is just 24 years old and hit .299/.342/.474 in 305
games prior to this season after batting .311/.359/.519 in the minors.

Despite all of that, Kemp wasn’t picked for the All-Star game while
eight outfielders and a grand total of 21 position players made the NL
squad and has inexplicably batted higher than sixth in the Dodgers’
lineup just 13 times. Meanwhile, he’s batted seventh 40 times and
either eighth or ninth 18 times. Has a 24-year-old career
.305/.352/.482 hitter and Gold Glove-caliber center fielder ever
received less credit?

As a wise man once said: “I’m speechless. Speechless. I have no speech.”

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.