Yankees Old Timer's Day might need a nap

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Disclaimer: I love baseball. I love history. I love baseball history.
I’m a Mets fan who does not dislike the Yankees (settle down Benigno).

That being said … it might be time to put this Old Timer’s Day thing on the shelf for a couple years until guys like Jeter and Mariano and O’Neill
are old and gray and haven’t been heard from in 10 years. Then you
celebrate them and everyone’s happy and it’s a great time for all. Or
do it every 5 years.

But do the Yanks really need to do this every year? If you continue
to have these ceremonies where the greats (and some non-greats) all
trot out, the oversaturation factor kicks in. Within the last 12
months, the Yanks have now had four similar celebrations – All-Star
Game, final game at Old Yankee Stadium, opening of New Yankee Stadium,
Old Timer’s Day – where the team honors its past. Seriously, we get it.
The Yankees are the greatest franchise ever. You had us at the 183rd
time you told us.

Most of the legends have passed on (Mickey, Joe D). Now, Yogi and Whitey are surrounded by the likes of Dave Eiland, Homer Bush, and Aaron Small. To put things in perspective, imagine the Mets celebrating Old Timer’s Day with Tom Seaver, a couple other dudes from ’69, but also Rico Brogna, Bill Pulsipher, and Keith Miller. Everyone would make fun of it, right? Not to equate Mets history with Yankees history, but hopefully you get the point.

If the Yanks were inviting these guys because they’re truly
acknowledging that the lean years are just as important as the
championship years, then that’s one thing. I applaud that. But me
thinks that some of this crew is just roster filler. Guys like John Sterling, Michael Kay, and the YES propaganda crew rarely reminisce about Mike Easler or Pat Kelly.

And let’s not even get started about the politics with some of these choices. If you think that Joe Torre ever gets invited back with the current regime in place, you’re crazy.

Again, honoring your past is fantastic and the idea of an Old
Timer’s Day is wonderful. But when it gets watered down and played out,
it’s time to re-evaluate things. Let it breathe. Let Old Timer’s Day
take a nap for a couple years. It’s return will feel special again.

Shawn Tolleson becomes a free agent

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The Rangers outrighted reliever Shawn Tolleson off the 40-man roster on Wednesday. Rather than accept the assignment to Triple-A Round Rock, Tolleson has opted to become a free agent, Rangers executive VP of communications John Blake reports.

Tolleson, 28, emerged as a closer for the Rangers in 2015, but his follow-up campaign this year was dreadful. He finished with a 7.68 ERA and a 29/10 K/BB ratio in 36 1/3 innings. He eventually went on the 60-day disabled list with a back injury.

Despite the nightmarish season, it’s easy to see a team deciding to take a flier on Tolleson for the 2017 season.

Indians strongly considering starting Carlos Santana in left field sans DH

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 19:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a solo home run in the third inning against Marco Estrada #25 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game five of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 19, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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Indians slugger Carlos Santana hasn’t played in the outfield in a major league game since 2012, but the Indians are strongly considering starting him in left field for Game 3 of the World Series at Wrigley Field on Friday, MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian reports. As the game is hosted in a National League park, there is no DH rule in effect, so the Indians might otherwise have to keep Santana on the bench.

Santana is hitless in six at-bats in the World Series thus far, but he has drawn two walks. He has overall not had a great postseason, carrying an aggregate .564 OPS in 40 plate appearances since the beginning of the playoffs. Still, during the regular season, he had an .865 OPS so he can certainly be a threat on offense at any given moment.