Pace Car: Pujols, Teixeira, Lincecum, and others chase history, Gehrig, and burgers

Leave a comment

Plenty has been written and said about the season that Albert Pujols is having, but this nugget might be my favorite: he’s on pace for 60 HR and only 64 K. Incredible. In similar fashion, Roger Maris
only struck out 67 times during his 61-homer season in ’61. Others have
actually finished with more homers than strikeouts, notably Lou Gehrig (twice in three years: 49 HR, 31 K in 1934 and 49 HR, 46 K in 1936). Joe DiMaggio did it seven times in his career, with the craziest one coming in 1941, when he hit 30 bombs and struck out only 13(!) times.

Speaking of Yankees, Mark Teixeira is on his way to 41 HR and 43 doubles. He would become only the 34th player to have a 40-40 year (he also did it back in 2005), and the first Yankee since Gehrig (did it 3 times) in 1934.

Interestingly, the feat was accomplished 11 times from 1921 through 1940, and then didn’t happen again until Willie Stargell in 1973. Then there was another long drought until Albert Belle’s historic 50-50 season in 1995. Since Belle, 20 players have done the 40-40 thing, most recently Alfonso Soriano,
who actually reached the 40-40-40 club (41 steals to go with 46 HR and
41 doubles). Ironically, Soriano’s .911 OPS was the lowest of anyone in
this group.

(And for those wondering, Pujols is only on pace for 39 doubles).

As we pointed out in The Show this week (see below), Mark Reynolds
is in the middle of one of the most dynamic seasons ever. At this rate,
Reynolds will finish with 31 doubles, 44 homers, 113 RBI, 27 steals,
100 runs, 224 strikeouts (easily a MLB record), and 27 errors. THAT is
the definition of filling up the scoresheet.

In less spectacular fashion, Bobby Abreu has an
outside shot at putting up 100 in runs (on pace for 91), RBI (110), BB
(97), K (103), and In & Out Burgers (quantity unknown).

After fanning 10 more batters Friday night, Tim Lincecum is
on track for 289 strikeouts this year. So he’ll need to pick it up over
his last 15 or so starts to be the first guy to 300 since Randy Johnson in 2002.

Last year, Pedro Feliciano set a Mets record
with 86 appearances. He’s on pace for 90 this year, which would tie him
for sixth all-time (and the most by a lefty). The record is 104
appearances by Mike Marshall in 1974. Marshall also had three seasons of 90+ games.

Rougned Odor didn’t technically steal home, but he basically did

MLB.com
1 Comment

Just saw this from last night’s Tigers-Rangers game. It was pretty wild.

Rougned Odor walked in the seventh inning. He broke for second on a steal and was safe due to the throw going wild, allowing him to reach third base. The Tigers called on reliever Daniel Stumpf and he was effective in retiring the next two batters, leaving Odor on third with two out.

Stumpf, a lefty, was paying no attention whatsoever to Odor, so Odor just took off for home, attempting a straight steal. Stumpf was so surprised that he tried to throw home to nail Odor, and in so doing, he balked. That technically means that Odor scored on the balk, but I think it’s safe to say he would’ve scored on the strait steal regardless. Watch:

 

He definitely gets points for style.

 

Aroldis Chapman is pitching himself out of a job

Getty Images
7 Comments

Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman looked shaky again last night, coming in to the game with a three-run lead before allowing a two-run homer to the Mets’ Amed Rosario. He would nail down the save eventually, giving Sonny Gray his first win as a Yankee, but Chapman’s struggles were the talk of the game afterward.

It was the third appearance in a row in which Chapman has given up at least one run, allowing five runs on three hits — two of them homers — and walking four in his last three and a third innings pitched. He’s also hit a batter. That’s just the most acute portion of a long slide, however. He posted a 0.79 ERA in his first 12 appearances this year, before getting shelled twice and then going on the disabled list with shoulder inflammation, missing over a month. Since returning he’s allowed 12 runs — ten earned — in 23 appearances, breaking out to a 4.09 ERA. He’s also walked ten batters in that time. At present, his strikeout rate is the worst he’s featured since 2010. His walk rate is up and he’s allowing more hits per nine innings than he ever has.

It’s possible that he’s still suffering from shoulder problems. Whether or not that’s an issue, he looks to have a new health concern as he appeared to tweak his hamstring on the game’s final play last night when he ran over to cover first base. Chapman told reporters after the game that “it’s nothing to worry about,” and Joe Girardi said that Chapman would not undergo an MRI or anything, but he was clearly grimacing as he came off the mound and it’s something worth watching.

Also worth watching: Dellin Betances and David Robertson, Chapman’s setup men who have each shined as Yankees closers in the past and who may very soon find themselves closing once again if Chapman can’t figure it out. And Chapman seems to know it. He was asked if he still deserves to be the closer after the game. His answer:

“My job is to be ready to pitch everyday. As far as where I pitch, that’s not up to me. If at some point they need to remove me from the closer’s position, I’m always going to be ready to pitch.”

That’s a team-first answer, and for that Chapman should be lauded. But it’s also one that suggests Chapman himself knows he’s going to be out of a closer’s job soon if he doesn’t turn things around.