Red Sox, Bay shelve talks… again

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Boston’s contract talks with free-agent-to-be Jason Bay have ended, one week after the Red Sox made a new offer to their left fielder. The decision was termed mutual, and Bay still seems to want to settle in Boston:

“I’d still love to get something done here,” Bay told the Boston
Globe. “I like it here. But that being said, we just basically at this
point right now don’t want it to be an ongoing distraction, like I
said, for both of us coming to the field and answering contract
questions.

“So we’re kind of tabling it and there’s a big window at the end of
the year after the season. We can sit down and try to hammer something
out again. But the way things have gone so far, like I said, very
encouraged with that.”

The Red Sox have no one else they’re looking to break into left field,
so they’ll likely make a strong push to re-sign Bay or bring in Matt
Holliday after the season. The latter player might be turning into the
better investment, and while it shouldn’t play a huge role when such
major players are at stake, the Red Sox could potentially improve their
draft status by signing Holliday. They’d lose their first-round pick,
but they’d likely get a similar or better one when Bay signs elsewhere
and they’d pick up a supplemental selection.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.