Please stop the Hanley Ramirez fantasies

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The Marlins are in town to face the Red Sox, and you know what that means:

It’s a bittersweet sight to see the Florida Marlins arrive in
Boston. On one hand, seeing those turquoise and black uniforms trotting
out onto the Fenway grass is a reminder of the talent the Marlins’
organization has fed into Boston in the past — the Red Sox’ staff ace
and their third baseman are living proof of that. On the other hand,
there’s the tantalizing sight of one of baseball’s brightest young
stars returning to Fenway, a Red Sox prospect that was. That, of
course, would be Hanley Ramirez.

To this day, the debate rages on — what would you have done? With
the future of two franchises in your hands, with the chance to
drastically alter the careers of two of the game’s superstars, present
and future, would you pull the trigger? It’s not an easy call.

How is this not an easy call, even in hindsight? As the article itself
notes, if the Sox didn’t trade Ramirez, they wouldn’t have had Josh
Beckett or Mike Lowell, and without Josh Beckett and Mike Lowell, it’s
almost a certainty that they would not have won the 2007 World Series.
I know Boston has recently become the city of champions and all of
that, but I’m guessing that about 95% of the fan base would prefer a
title in the bag to even an All-Star shortstop. The other 5% are either
crazy or have an unhealthy fetish for potential and shiny numbers.

To the extent there remains any “debate” about the Hanley Ramirez
deal, it’s borne of either (a) a latent desire by Sox fans for their
team to possess every player worth a damn; and (b) the need for the
media to fill the void the morning after almost every team had the day

Video: Braden Halladay pays homage to Roy Halladay in spring game

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While newly-acquired talent Danny Espinosa was off collecting hits for the Blue Jays against the Orioles, Marcus Stroman led a youth-filled roster against the Canadian Junior National Team in a split-squad game on Saturday. In the eighth inning, 17-year-old Canadian pitcher Braden Halladay took the mound to honor his late father’s memory against his former team.

Halladay accomplished just that, wielding a fastball that topped out in the low-80s and setting down a perfect 1-2-3 inning against the top of the lineup. No one batter saw more than a single pitch from the right-hander: Mc Gregory Contreras and Mattingly Romanin flew out to the outfield corners and Bo Bichette laid down a ground ball for an easy third out.’s Gregor Chisholm has a fantastic profile of the high school junior, including his approach to the game and his attempt to do Roy Halladay proud while carving out his own path to the majors. “From a pitching standpoint, it was everything I could have asked for and more,” Halladay told reporters. “Especially now, every time I make mistakes, I still hear him drilling me about them in my head, just because he’s done it so many times before. From a mind-set standpoint, I don’t think with any bias that I could have had a better teacher.”