Should we raise the pitcher's mound?

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The All-Star break is a good time to talk about stuff we normally don’t
have time to discuss because things like ballgames and transactions and
stuff get in the way. Things like this, which is an article advocating for a return to the pre-1968 pitchers’ mound:

If Major League Baseball is serious about trying to find ways to
escape the fallout of the steroid era, raising the pitching mound would
seem to be a no-brainer . . . It’s time to take another look. It’s time
to realize Gibson’s 1.12 was an exceptional year by an exceptional
pitcher. Those tiny ERAs? Evidence suggests they were more a mirage
than a trend — and hitters have been having far too much fun. It’s
time to give the pitchers a break. It’s time to restore at least part
of the real estate missing from the middle of baseball diamonds
everywhere. It’s time to Bring Back The Hill. Now.

I don’t believe that outrageous offense is as big a problem now as it
was a few years ago, but it strikes me that this could be a good idea
regardless of its direct effects on offense. I could totally see a
higher mound leading to fewer pitchers’ injuries as hurlers will be
able to generate a bit more velocity via gravity as opposed to muscle,
and could theoretically lower their arm slots a bit — thus reducing
shoulder strain — and still get a good angle of attack at a batter.

Just spitballin’ here.

Hey, that gives me another idea . . .

Mets, Orioles have discussed a Matt Harvey trade

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Orioles and Mets have discussed a trade for Matt Harvey.

Rosenthal says the discussions have involved a reliever going back to New York and observes that that Harvey and Brad Brach are projected for similar salaries in their final arbitration years which could make a financial match.

There have been a handful of Harvey rumors over the past couple of days, with a report coming out yesterday that the Mets have spoken with at least two teams about their fallen ace. Jon Heyman said today that the Rangers may have been one of those teams. Maybe the Orioles are the second or, perhaps, the third?

All if this has to be pretty deflating if you’re a Mets fan, given the promise and dominance Harvey showed before injuries waylaid him the past two seasons. Harvey is still just 28 but he made only 18 starts and one relief appearance last year, posting a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92.2 innings.

If the Mets can’t find a trade partner this winter, they’ll clearly hope for him to rebound at least a little bit in 2018, allowing him to regain some trade value.