One of the 5,359 reasons the Home Run Derby sucks

Leave a comment

And now, the moment only the masochistic among you have been waiting for, the Home Run Derby:

The 2009 State Farm Home Run Derby field was finalized on Sunday,
when American League home run leader Carlos Pena was named to replace
the Red Sox’s Dustin Pedroia on the AL roster for Tuesday’s All-Star
Game and as the fourth AL entrant in the Derby . . . Pena joins Tigers
third baseman Brandon Inge, Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz and Twins
catcher Joe Mauer from the Junior Circuit, and the National League
features big league homer leader, hometown hero and All-Star
centerpiece Albert Pujols of the Cardinals, plus Adrian Gonzalez of the
Padres, Brewers first baseman Prince Fielder and Ryan Howard of the
Phillies.

I just can’t stand the derby. It’s tedious. It’s repetitive. It gets
worse as it goes on because guys get tired. It’s just really not my cup
of tea. But worst of all, it features Chris Berman calling each and
every shot, and that’s ninth circle of hell stuff. This year even more
so, because I recently discovered that, in addition to being annoying,
his “back, back, back” business is both (a) stolen; and (b) wrong. I read this last week while doing some research on fabled Dodgers and Yankees broadcaster Red Barber:

A number of play-by-play announcers, including Chris Berman, picked
up on his use of “back, back, back” to describe a long fly ball with
potential to be a home run. Oddly, those other announcers are
describing the flight of the ball, whereas Barber was describing the
outfielder, in this famous call from Game 6 of the 1947 World Series
with Joe DiMaggio at bat: “Here’s the pitch, swung on, belted… it’s a
long one… back goes Gionfriddo, back, back, back, back, back, back…
heeee makes a one-handed catch against the bullpen! Oh, Doctor!”

Which makes sense when you think about it because the ball, as far as
it’s concerned anyway, is going forward. It’s the outfielder who is
going back.

Either way, fine Berman, steal from Red Barber if you must. But at
least steal correctly. There are no outfielders making plays on the
ball at the Home Run Derby, so there shouldn’t be any “back, back,
backs.” If you agree to drop that tired, stolen and inaccurate shtick,
I’ll agree to watch your little exhibition. Deal?

Umpire ejects Adrian Beltre for moving on-deck circle

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images
2 Comments

As far as ejections go, this is one of the stranger ones you’ll hear about. Rangers third baseman Adrian Beltre was ejected in the bottom of the eighth inning of a game his team trailed at the time 18-6. Beltre was a few feet away from the circle towards home plate and was asked by Marlins pitcher Drew Steckenrider to get into the circle. So rather than step a few feet back to his right, Beltre picked up the circle and dragged it to where he was. And that got him ejected by second base umpire Gerry Davis. Manager Jeff Banister was also ejected after having a word with Davis.

Here’s a video from Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports:

Beltre, by the way, went 3-for-3 with a walk, a pair of doubles, and a solo home run. He’s now four hits away from 3,000 for his career.

Video: Phillies prospect J.P. Crawford hits an inside-the-park grand slam

Elsa/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Phillies shortstop prospect J.P. Crawford’s stock has fallen sharply this season. He had an abysmal first three months, batting .203/.321/.276 in 291 plate appearances. Baseball America rated him the 12th overall prospect in baseball going into the season and rated him No. 92 in their midseason top 100. It was bad.

Since the calendar turned to July, however, Crawford has been more like his normal self. In 92 at-bats this month entering Wednesday night’s action, he was hitting .300/.391/.650 with six home runs, 13 RBI, 18 runs scored, and a terrific 15/12 K/BB ratio.

Crawford padded his stats more on Wednesday night as he circled the bases for an inside-the-park grand slam. Via the IronPigs Twitter:

Crawford was actually dead-to-rights at home, but he fooled the catcher with a great late slide.

Crawford finished 1-for-3 with a walk along with the slam on the night as the IronPigs beat the Gwinnett Braves 8-2.