Baseball is getting an eye in the sky

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Big Brother will soon be watching you, major leaguers, and it’s a really, really good thing:

As baseball’s statistical revolution marches on, the last refuge for
the baseball aesthete has been the sport’s less quantifiable skills:
outfielders’ arm strength, base-running efficiency and other
you-won’t-find-that-in-the-box-score esoterica. But debates over the
quickest center fielder or the rangiest shortstop are about to graduate
from argument to algorithm.

A new camera and software system in its final testing phases will
record the exact speed and location of the ball and every player on the
field, allowing the most digitized of sports to be overrun anew by
hundreds of innovative statistics that will rate players more
accurately, almost certainly affect their compensation and perhaps
alter how the game itself is played.

This is going to be a huge in that it will (a) take most of the
guesswork out of player analysis by allowing us to quantify defense and
base running and things like that; and (b) it will radically alter the
scouting landscape, likely replacing the subjective analysis of a
traveling baseball man with the objective analysis of guys in cubes
back at the home office. Make as many derisive spreadsheet-and-laptop
jokes about that as you’d like, but it will make teams smarter and

One potential application not mentioned in the article: enhancing
broadcasts of games. If you capture everything, would it not be
possible one day to allow viewers at home to watch the game from any
number of angles rather than rely on the centerfield shot and whatever
else a director in a truck wants us to see? If that happens, one of the
best things about seeing a game in person — being able to watch what,
say, the third baseman does as the pitcher goes into the windup or what
the base runner on third is doing to distract him — can be enjoyed
from the comforts of home.

Estrada in Game 3, Dickey in Game 4 for Blue Jays

Marco Estrada
AP Photo/Kathy Willens
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It’s already been established that the Blue Jays would throw deadline acquisition David Price in Game 1 of their ALDS matchup against the Rangers and fast-rising right-hander Marcus Stroman in Game 2.

Now we know how they’ll fill out the rest of their rotation for the best-of-five round …

John Lott of the National Post notes that R.A. Dickey threw a simulated game on Tuesday afternoon at Rogers Centre, which lines him up for a potential ALDS Game 4 next Monday in Texas. Marco Estrada will take Game 3 on Sunday night in Arlington.

Mark Buehrle retired after his final regular-season start, so he’s obviously out of the mix.

Toronto is the World Series favorite to many as the postseason gets underway.

Yasiel Puig might be more of a bench guy in the NLDS

Yasiel Puig
AP Photo/Danny Moloshok
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Yasiel Puig appeared in just 79 games during the regular season and missed all of September with a right hamstring strain. He returned on October 3 and appeared in the Dodgers’ final two regular-season games, but that doesn’t mean he is anywhere close to 100 percent heading into the NLDS.

Mark Saxon of ESPN Los Angeles says the Dodgers are unlikely to start Puig over Andre Ethier or Carl Crawford against right-handers in the best-of-five Division Series. And the Mets are scheduled to throw three righties in the first three games: Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, and Matt Harvey. The only left-hander in the Mets’ postseason rotation is Steven Matz, and he is somewhat questionable with a back injury.

Would it make sense to leave Puig off the NLDS roster entirely? If he does aggravate the hamstring injury, which seems possible even in a limited role, that would put him out of the mix for the NLCS.

They could send Puig to Arizona and have him face live pitching for the next 8-10 days.

But that’s just a suggestion. It doesn’t sound like it’s actually a consideration.