Adam Dunn is not going to be traded

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There are some rumors that Adam Dunn could be had from the Nationals, but the Nats’ GM says that he is not available:

“We are not trading Adam Dunn. That’s as definitive as I can be . .
. By no means is Adam Dunn on the trading block. We do not want to move
Adam Dunn. We acquired him to keep him in the long-term. He’s having an
All-Star type of first half, he’s a leader in the clubhouse and he’s
the anchor of the middle of our lineup.”

Which makes total sense. For one thing, there isn’t a team out there
who (a) needs a bad defender/DH; (b) has the money to pay Dunn’s
contract through the end of 2010; and (c) has the kind of prospects to
send back to Washington that would make the P.R. of it all (i.e.
trading your big free agent splash just over three months into the
season) worth the Nationals’ while.

As Nats’ watcher and NBC Washington contributor Chris Needham notes in this comments thread,
the Nationals have been down this road before, last time with Alfonso
Soriano. Many criticized Washington for not trading him during his
career-year in 2006 and instead allowing him to become a free agent.
What most people don’t realize, however, is that Washington got two
compensation picks for him in return. One of those pics is Jordan
Zimmermann, who, unlike anything the Nats could have gotten for Soriano
that July, is likely to be a part of the next good Nationals team.

Well, the first good Nationals team, but you see my point.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.