Stick a fork in 'em – The 2009 Diamondbacks

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While they have a slightly better record than the Indians, the
Diamondbacks are the second team we’re declaring dead for 2009.
Wednesday’s loss dropped them 18 1/2 games back in the NL West. Even
the lowly Nationals, the recipient of the first fork of the year, are a mere 17 1/2 games in the NL East.

So, let’s examine what the D’backs can look forward to in 2010.

The 2010 depth chart

Catcher: Chris Snyder, Miguel Montero (Arb.), Orlando Mercado, James Skelton

If they hadn’t been so stubborn about holding out for Michael Bowden,
the Diamondbacks very likely could have had Daniel Bard from the Red
Sox for Montero over the winter. Unfortunately, they probably wouldn’t
do so well now. Montero hasn’t progressed in an expanded role first
brought upon by the managerial switch to A.J. Hinch and then enhanced
further by Snyder’s recent DL stint.

The team could instead opt to move Snyder, who will make $10.5 million
between 2010 and 2011, but they’d be fortunate to receive more than a
couple of B prospects back. Since there aren’t any assurances that
Montero will be a quality regular and none of the team’s prospects
project as starters, standing pat may well be the best strategy.

First base: Conor Jackson (Arb.), Mark Reynolds, Josh Whitesell

Whitesell is a quad-A player and Chad Tracy is a free agent, so the
Diamondbacks could either turn Reynolds into a first baseman or look
outside of the organization for a solution this winter. My guess is
that they’ll leave Reynolds at third, given that he has the range for
the position and he’s been even more error-prone than usual while
playing first base this year. Jackson has appeared to be more valuable
defensively in left field than he was at first base. More on him below.

Second base: Ryan Roberts, Augie Ojeda (Arb.), Rusty Ryal, Ruben Gotay, Mark Hallberg, James Skelton

Yes, it’s that bleak. Ryan, a 26-year-old hitting .286/.345/.500 in
the PCL, figures to get a look at second base if the Diamondbacks trade
free-agent-to-be Felipe Lopez. However, he should be nothing more than
a fallback option again in 2009. Since Hallberg hasn’t hit in Double-A,
the Diamondbacks should be in the market for a veteran second baseman
for the second year in a row. Fortunately, decent ones are usually
pretty easy to find.

Third base: Mark Reynolds, Augie Ojeda (Arb.), Ryan Roberts

If the Diamondbacks did move Reynolds across the diamond, they’d
just have to go after a replacement at third instead. The club did
draft third basemen with the 16th and 35th selections in the 2009 draft
(Bobby Borchering and Matt Davidson), but both were high school players
and neither will move quickly.

Shortstop: Stephen Drew (Arb.), Augie Ojeda, Pedro Ciriaco

One of the few positives for the Diamondbacks this year is that
Drew’s fielding numbers have been considerably better than they were
last year. I could see an argument for moving Drew to third and
Reynolds to first, but it’s not something with any chance of happening
in the near future. Besides, the Diamondbacks don’t have a Elvis Andrus
to break in at short.

Left field: Conor Jackson (Arb.), Gerardo Parra, Eric Byrnes, Trent Oeltjen, Cyle Hankerd, Collin Cowgill

Center field: Chris Young, Gerardo Parra, Eric Byrnes

Right field: Justin Upton, Gerardo Parra, Eric Byrnes

We know Upton is a fixture in right. The Diamondbacks will have to
decide whether it’s worth trading Young or moving Jackson back to first
base to make room for Parra in the 2010 outfield. The 22-year-old Parra
got off to a very nice start after coming up as Jackson’s replacement
this year, but he’s now sporting a .259/.302/.400 line and given that
he’s never played in Triple-A, he still might need some additional
seasoning.

Complicating things is that both Young and Jackson have lost a great
deal of trade value. Young showed clear signs of bouncing back from a
horrendous start last month, but he’ll have to keep it up if the
Diamondbacks are going to get fair value for him this season.
Unfortunately, it looks like Jackson’s season has been completely
ruined by his case of valley fever, but at least that means he’s not
going to receive much of a raise from his current $3 million salary.

The Diamondbacks are almost certainly stuck with Byrnes, who figures to remain an $11 million fourth outfielder.

I think a Jackson-Young-Upton outfield will be the best option at
the beginning of 2010. However, Parra would likely guarantee himself a
spot with a strong second half.

Rotation: Brandon Webb (option), Dan Haren, Max Scherzer, Jon
Garland (option), Jarrod Parker, Yusmeiro Petit, Esmerling Vasquez,
Cesar Valdez, Billy Buckner, Bryan Augenstein, Barry Enright

If Webb can come back from his shoulder problems in September, then the
$6 million decision on his 2010 option will remain an easy call. Still,
it’s not like the Diamondbacks will be able to pencil him in for 220
innings next year.

The uncertainty around Webb is probably the one thing that could
cause the Diamondbacks to listen to offers for Haren. A team with a
Webb-Haren-Scherzer front three should be capable of competing next
year. However, if the Diamondbacks suddenly learned that Webb needed
surgery that would cost him at least part of next year, they’d have to
give serious thought to cashing in Haren for the huge return he’d bring
in. He’s under control through 2013 at fairly reasonable terms.

The Diamondbacks, though, won’t really know about Webb’s health
until the final month, making a Haren deadline deal awfully unlikely.

Doug Davis is a free agent and is likely to be traded. Garland is on
a mutual option, making it unlikely that he’ll be back. Ideally, the
Diamondbacks will replace him with a similar fourth-starter type and
then get by with a Petit or Valdez in the fifth spot until Parker
arrives. He could be next year’s Tommy Hanson.

Bullpen: Chad Qualls, Tony Pena (Arb.), Jon Rauch, Juan Gutierrez,
Daniel Schlereth, Clay Zavada, Esmerling Vasquez, Billy Buckner,
Yusmeiro Petit, Blaine Boyer (Arb.), Daniel Strange, Bobby Korecky,
Doug Slaten, Leo Rosales, Jose Marte, Kyler Newby

Qualls is only under control through 2010 and could receive a raise to
$4.5 million-$5 million in arbitration after spending a full year as a
closer, so he might be the Diamondback most likely to go in a deadline
deal. Rauch, now that he’s past his early-season woes, is next in line.
That would potential leave Pena as the Diamondbacks’ closer, though he
hasn’t made a particularly strong case for the role while posting a
4.36 ERA this season. Gutierrez would be another option. Schlereth, a
left-hander picked in the first round last year, is the best bet for
the long-term. If the Diamondbacks do move Qualls, they’ll probably
look for a cheap veteran to serve as a stopgap closer next year.

Time for a best guess:

Arizona’s 2010 roster

Lineup

2B Free agent

SS Stephen Drew

RF Justin Upton

3B Mark Reynolds

1B Free agent

LF Conor Jackson

CF Chris Young

C Chris Snyder

Bench: OF Eric Byrnes, C Miguel Montero, INF Augie Ojeda, INF Ryan Roberts, OF Free agent

Rotation

Dan Haren

Brandon Webb

Max Scherzer

Free agent

Cesar Valdez

Bullpen

Free agent

Tony Pena

Juan Gutierrez

Clay Zavada

Free agent

Esmerling Vasquez

Billy Buckner

Ideally, the Diamondbacks will get their answer at first, second or
in the rotation in return for Davis later this month. Qualls could also
bring back someone capable of playing an important role on the 2010
club. There probably won’t be a whole lot of money available after
raises for Drew, Young, Haren and Snyder kick in. One huge factor in
how much flexibility the Diamondbacks will have is whether Reynolds
qualifies as a super-two player. He’ll have two years and 138 days of
service time at season’s end. Last year, Taylor Buchholz was the last
player to qualify as a super two and he had two years, 140 days. With
the season Reynolds is having, it could be a $5 million swing for the
Diamondbacks.

Nationals will add Mat Latos to the roster on Thursday

ARLINGTON, TX - MAY 11:  Mat Latos #38 of the Chicago White Sox pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the first inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on May 11, 2016 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
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Thursday is September 1, which means rosters expand. As a result, the Nationals plan to promote pitcher Mat Latos to the major league roster, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports. Latos had an opt-out clause for Monday, but after discussing the matter with the team, he agreed to stay at Triple-A Syracuse until Thursday.

Latos, 28, put up a 4.62 ERA over 11 starts with the White Sox before being released in mid-June. Nearly two weeks later, he signed a minor league contract with the Nationals.

In the Nationals’ minor league system, Latos has made three starts for the club’s Gulf Coast League team as well as three for Syracuse. In aggregate, the right-hander has yielded six runs (four earned) on 20 hits and 10 walks with 28 strikeouts in 28 innings.

Latos will likely pitch out of a long relief role for the Nationals and can be used as starting rotation insurance as well.

John Gibbons texts Mark Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September.”

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - OCTOBER 2:  Mark Buehrle #56 of the Toronto Blue Jays pitches during the second inning of a game against the Tampa Bay Rays on October 2, 2015 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida.  (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
Brian Blanco/Getty Images
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Mark Buehrle hasn’t officially retired, but he hasn’t thrown a pitch in professional baseball since last October. Still, the Blue Jays wouldn’t mind having some insurance, so manager John Gibbons recently texted Buehrle, “You know, rosters expand in September,” Sportsnet’s Ben Nicholson-Smith reports.

Buehrle’s response? He texted back a picture of a lake. Sounds like he’s not interested in making a return, at least this year.

Last year, at the age of 36, Buehrle went 15-8 with a 3.81 ERA with a 91/33 K/BB ratio in 198 2/3 innings while leading the league with four complete games. He fell 1 1/3 innings shy of a 15th consecutive 200-inning season. There are many worse ways to end a career.