That steroid list is a phony

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So there’s a website out there which purports to have the list of the
2003 drug test failures — the same list that gave us Alex Rodriguez
and Sammy Sosa. We’re not linking it or reproducing the names listed
there because it’s a fake. That fact was confirmed this morning by a
source who is definitely in a position to know. Anyone who gives it any
credence going forward is trafficking in baloney.

But you know what? We kind of suspected that it was fake beforehand.
Why? Because for starters, the site running it — something called
“Roto Info” — has zero reputation as a reliable news source. Really
zero — before now it has never to our knowledge reported anything, be
it good, bad or indifferent. Now it is shown to be untrustworthy, lazy
and irresponsible. For the moment let’s give them the benefit of the
doubt and say that they were merely passing this along as opposed to
having created it themselves. Even then, posting it with a weak
“unconfirmed” disclaimer as they did here does not
get the job done. Most bloggers have day jobs yet still manage to get
off their butts and get this stuff right. “Roto Info” should be no
different. The lesson: get your roto info from Rotoworld.

Second, the list consists of an overwhelming number of bigger names and
very few scrubs. This flies in the face of the information we have
learned from the Mitchell Report,
the Radomski and McNamee business and the testing results that have
been made public since 2003. Where are the Marvin Bernards, Tim Lakers,
Josias Manzanillos, Matt Francos, and Adam Piatts of the world?
Steroids are equal-opportunity, and the fact that this list is almost
entirely devoid of 23rd-25th roster slots puts lie to any notion of
legitimacy.

Third, the names are listed in team order, by division, going from east to west, AL to NL. On the eve of the Mitchell Report there was another fake list like this one.
It was in alphabetical order, and looked fishy for the same reasons.
While this isn’t necessarily suspicious in and of itself — we can
conceive of some reasons why the list could take on such an order — it
suggests someone being a little more methodical about it than might
appear in nature.

Finally, and perhaps most damningly, Jason Grimsley’s name is not on the list, and by all accounts it should be.
Indeed, our source’s debunking of this list specifically mentioned
Grimsley’s absence, and the absence of other known-positives, as the
clincher of its fraudulent nature.

If and when the real list ever surfaces, you can bet that we’ll be
on top of it. You can also bet that we’ll confirm it first. In the
meantime, we’ll be busy throttling the blogger who ran this nonsense
for doing even more to discredit the medium than has already been done.

Cardinals closer Trevor Rosenthal to be examined for arm tightness

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Cardinal closer Trevor Rosenthal was taken out of last night’s game against the Red Sox after he gave up a big homer and a walk. He velocity was down as well, and Mike Mathney said after the game that he didn’t look right. Now the Cardinals are going to take a closer look at him, and he’ll be examined today for what is being described as “tightness” in his right arm.

Rosenthal is 3-4 with a 3.40 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 76/20 in 47.2 innings. He has 11 saves after regaining the closer’s job from Seung Hwan Oh. Now some combination of Oh, Tyler Lyons, and John Brebbia will fill in for Rosenthal to the extent he needs to miss time.

Aaron Judge broke a dubious record last night

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Aaron Judge hit a monster home run in last night’s win over the Mets, but he also set a dubious record. Judge struck out for the 33rd consecutive game, setting a new mark for a position player in a single season.

Yes, that’s qualified. No pitchers, of course, as I assume many of them have struck out in more than 33 straight games. Also,  Adam Dunn once struck out in 36 straight games, but that straddled two seasons: he struck out in the final four games of 2011 and the first 32 games of 2012. Still, Judge’s feat is impressive, and given the nature of his game and the state of baseball these days, it’s not hard to imagine him striking out in three or four more straight games anyway.

None of which, by the way, should be all that much of a slight on Judge. The guy is still hitting .291/.420/.614, even with his second half slump. If I was a manager I’d happily accept his whiffs in exchange for everything else he brings to the table. It’s not 1959 anymore, and strikeouts are not the worst thing that can happen.