Link-O-Rama: Beltre undergoes shoulder surgery

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* As expected, Adrian Beltre will undergo shoulder surgery today and MLB.com reports
that the best-case scenario has him returning in mid-August. Seattle
will miss Beltre’s outstanding glove and may choose to further weaken
their defense in the hopes of helping the league’s worst offense by
shifting Russell Branyan to third base while using prospect Mike Carp
at first base.

* Despite hitting just .250/.298/.303 with poor defense Emilio
Bonifacio still has people defending his play via cliches and
platitudes, as Juan C. Rodriguez of the Florida Sun-Sentinel writes stuff like
“he’s shown no signs of being a ‘me’ player.” My guess is that there
aren’t many 24-year-olds posting a .601 OPS in their first full season
who qualify as “me” players.

* Both the San Francisco Chronicle and Chicago Tribune report that the Giants are interested in Jermaine Dye, but as Dye himself notes the White Sox probably aren’t in sell mode right now after finally climbing back to .500 with yesterday’s win.

* In a recent Sports Illustrated poll Lou Piniella was named
the manager players would least like to play for. And the amazing thing
is that Milton Bradley wasn’t even eligible to vote for him.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.