Ballplayers at the top of a ponzi scheme

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Here’s Scott Boras’ comment back in February when it was revealed that several baseball players were among the clients of suspected fraudster Robert Allen Stanford:

“The broker dealers the players have chosen have advised our
personal management auditors the players are not in jeopardy of losing
money.”

Here’s the news from yesterday:

The lawyer trying to recover the money from R. Allen Stanford’s
purported Ponzi scheme wants seven current and former Major League
Baseball stars who had invested with the accused swindler to turn over
millions of dollars, mostly of the players’ own money.

Ralph S. Janvey, whom the Securities and Exchange Commission
appointed as the “receiver” in the case, wants to take $9.5 million
from the players, an amount that mostly consists of their initial
investments, so that the athletes’ money can be split up among all of
Mr. Stanford’s purported victims.

“The fact that the [ballplayers] are innocent investors and
committed no wrongdoing does not entitle them to retain proceeds
received from the fraudulent” scheme, lawyers for Mr. Janvey wrote in a
filing last week with the U.S. District Court in Dallas.

Oops.

The players who, if the motion is granted, stand to lose millions
include Greg Maddux, Johnny Damon, J.D. Drew, Andruw Jones, Carlos
Pena, and Jay Bell.

The question I asked back in February and for which I’d still like
an answer is whether Scott Boras — who makes a big deal about how he’s
a full-service representative — steered these guys to Stanford. Maybe
someone in a position to should ask him.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.