And That Happened: Monday's scores and recaps

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White Sox 6, Indians 3:
Nice Indians’ debut for Chris Perez: He hit the first two batters he
faced, walked the bases loaded and then gave up a fielder’s choice, an
RBI double, a wild pitch and run-scoring single. One of the guys he hit
— Alexei Ramirez — took it in the head and had to leave the game.
Congratulations, Mark Shapiro and Eric Wedge! After fifteen years of
respectability, you have finally brought the Indians back around
full-circle to “Major League” territory, complete with Rick Vaughn on
the mound.

Cubs 3, Pirates 1:
Rich Harden was impressive, striking out nine and giving up only one
run — while scattering nine hits — over seven innings. Phil Rogers
will likely call for the Cubs to waive him tomorrow. In other news,
this may have been the perfect Craig day at the ballpark: small crowd,
weekday game, not too hot, good pitching, done in 2:17. Really makes me
wish I was there. I can almost taste the Yuengling.

Rays 4, Blue Jays 1:
Roy Halladay came back and was good (6 IP, 5 H, 2 ER, 7K), but not good
enough. Carl Crawford hit a two-run homer, got another hit and stole a
base. Pat Burrell too. The homer I mean. If he stole a base I probably
would have led with that.

Red Sox 4, Orioles 0:
Jon Lester was fantastic (7 IP, 5 H, 0 ER, 8K) and J.D. Drew homered,
tripled, and singled, driving in two. “Baltimore citizenry welcome
Boston conquerors: ‘we kept your rooms just the way you left them’.”
The Red Sox are 22-9 at Camden Yards since the end of 2005 and have won
eight straight there.

Giants 10, Cardinals 0:
Holy crap, Tim Lincecum is good (CG, SHO, 2 H, 8K, 0 BB). Clayton
Mortensen hitting Aaron Roward on the knee with a pitch in the seventh
was the hardest hit the Cardinals had all night.

Marlins 4, Nationals 2:
Florida vs. Washington, on a Monday night in Miami, with a rain delay.
It says that paid attendance was over 10,000. What do you suppose the
real attendance was. Seventeen? Thirty?

Brewers 10, Mets 6: According to the Journal-Sentinel’s Tom Haudricourt,
Gary Sheffield was booed heavily each time he came to bat. Sheffield
was traded away from Milwaukee over seventeen years ago. Sure, he left
as a very, very unpopular Brewer, having called out the team’s pitchers
and allegedly tanked plays at third base on purpose. Either way,
though, seventeen years is a long time to hold a grudge, isn’t it?
Willie Randolph was the starting second basemen and Jim Gantner was the
starting third baseman on Sheff’s last Brewer club. Rick Dempsey was on
that roster. Maybe they should let it go, ya know?

Royals 4, Twins 2:
Luke Hochevar has had one dawg of a start since his recall on June 6th,
but the others have been aces, including this one (7 IP, 2 H. 0 ER).
Like J.D. Drew in the Red Sox game, Miguel Olivo came a double short of
the cycle, driving in two runs.

Angels 5, Rangers 4:
The Angels are starting to pull away from Texas. This saddens me
because I think I may have been the only person in the free world who
picked Texas to win the west before the season started and I don’t want
to see them slide out of contention. Kendry Morales and Juan Rivera did
the damage for Anaheim, driving in a pair each.

Astros 3, Padres 1: Roy Oswalt’s still got it (CG, 2 H, 1 ER 8K), as he continues to own San Diego.

Athletics 7, Tigers 1:
Rick Porcello was beat up by an A’s offense that doesn’t beat up many,
giving up five runs on nine hits. This is one of the better passages
from a game story this year: “After Porcello was chased, left-hander
Fu-Te Ni struck out Giambi in his major league debut. Ni didn’t know
who Giambi was, and he raised his eyebrows in surprise when told of
Giambi’s achievements.”

Dodgers 4, Rockies 2:
The Dodgers win it on a walkoff homer by Andre Ethier, but it sure took
a while to get there. The Dodgers used eight pitchers, so Joe Torre is
probably going to be sore today from all of that walking back and forth
to the mound.

Madison Bumgarner likely sidelined through the All-Star break

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It’s been just over a week since Giants’ left-hander Madison Bumgarner got a serious scare after a nasty dirt bike accident. He escaped with bruised ribs and a Grade 2 strain of his left shoulder AC joint, but there was some speculation that the injuries would cause a significant, if not permanent, setback in the southpaw’s career. Thankfully, things aren’t looking quite so bleak today. Not only will Bumgarner not require surgery, but he could return as soon as the week following the All-Star break, the Giants said Friday.

Of course, that timeline is wholly dependent on how smoothly the recovery process goes, so nothing is set in stone yet. NBC Sports Bay Area’s Alex Pavlovic estimates 2-3 months of rest and rehab, including “two months before he can get back on the mound and then another three to four weeks of throwing and rehab starts before he’s big league-ready.” It’s a long and laborious schedule, but still looks much better than any surgical alternative.

Prior to the accident, Bumgarner was working on a solid start to the 2017 season. He maintained a 3.00 ERA, 1.3 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 through 27 innings with the club, though his average 1.75 runs of support per start fed into an 0-3 record.

Video: Manny Machado hits a 470-foot home run

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You’ve seen Carlos Gomez’s 461-foot home run. You’ve seen Joey Gallo’s 462-foot blast. You’ve seen Corey Seager’s 462-footer, too. During Friday’s series opener against the Yankees, Manny Machado delivered the tie-breaker we were all hoping for, launching a 470-foot moonshot over the center field wall to pad the Orioles’ 5-0 lead in the fifth:

It was Machado’s fourth homer of the season, and quite a doozy, according to Statcast. MLB.com’s Brittany Ghiroli says that it’s currently the longest home run recorded at Yankee Stadium, dating back through Statcast’s inception in 2015.

Through eight innings, the Yankees and Orioles combined for five home runs and two grand slams, though none reached quite as far as Machado’s record-setting blast. Aaron Judge went deep twice, hitting the 417-foot mark in the fifth inning and the 435-mark in the sixth, while Mark Trumbo executed a 459-foot grand slam in the sixth inning, followed by a 420-foot slam from Jacoby Ellsbury in the seventh. The Orioles currently lead the Yankees 11-8 in the ninth inning.