Yankees and Mets fans are unimaginative

Leave a comment

Freakonomics
— the book, the blog, the phenomenon — is basically about applying
economic theory to non-traditional things. Things like parenting and
sumo and the Ku Klux Klan and what have you. It’s pretty interesting
stuff, actually, that reminds people that economics is way more about
social and behavioral science than it is about money and numbers.

Freakonomics author Stephen Dubner was at the Mets-Yankees game last night, and he wonders why Yankees and Mets fans are so darn economically inefficient when it comes to their cheers and taunts:

A pattern quickly emerged. The many Yankees fans regularly broke
into their thunderous cheer: “Let’s go Yankees!” (clap-clap-clap-clap …
clap-clap). If you are a Yankees fan (we are; but we do not hate the
Mets), this was a sign of what might be called prideful hubris, or
maybe hubristic pride: we can come into your stadium and rock it very,
very hard.

How’d the Mets fans respond? Succinctly. In the space where the
Yankees fans did their rhythmic clapping, Mets fans shouted “Yankees
suck!” . . .This pattern was repeated all night. What surprised me is
that neither side found a way to improve their effort. I kept waiting
for the Yankees fans to fill in their clapping with some chanting that
couldn’t be hijacked by the Mets fans, and I kept waiting for the Mets
fans to either be proactive in their chanting or to move beyond
“Yankees suck!” But neither side budged . . . I fear not that we are
teaching our children to be coarse but that we are teaching them to be
uncreative and unskilled in the use of game theory.

I can think of no greater indictment of the new expensive ballparks in
New York than the fact that they have priced out one of the greatest
forces of nature in the universe: verbally abusive, yet incredibly
clever New York baseball fans.

Dodgers top Giants, clinch fifth straight NL West title

Getty Images
1 Comment

The Dodgers are NL West champions for the fifth time in a row. They clinched with a 4-2 win over the Giants on Friday night, taking their first and only lead on a mammoth record-breaking home run from Cody Bellinger in the third inning.

Rich Hill turned in another quality start, going six innings with five hits, a run and nine strikeouts to keep the Giants at bay. He tacked on an RBI hit of his own, too, lashing a double to left field for his first extra-base hit since 2007.

The Giants, meanwhile, deployed Jeff Samardzija and his 4.42 ERA for 4 1/3 innings. Samardzija was on the hook for the Dodgers’ four-run spread in the third and took his 15th loss of the season. Pablo Sandoval came through with a solo home run in the ninth, but the rest of San Francisco’s offense wasn’t so lucky against Kenley Jansen, who struck out the side to clinch the game — and the division.

After Friday’s showstopper, the Dodgers are just two wins away from their first 100-win season since 1974. If they win the remaining eight games of the season, they’ll beat out the 1953 Brooklyn Dodgers for the most wins in franchise history.

Watch: Cody Bellinger breaks NL rookie home run record

Getty Images
2 Comments

Cody Bellinger helped the Dodgers to their first lead on Friday night, going deep for his 39th home run of the season and setting a new National League rookie home run record in the process. With two on and two out in the third inning, the Dodgers’ slugger launched a 2-1 pitch from the Giants’ Jeff Samardzija, skimming the right field fence to give the team a three-run cushion:

The three-run bomb was Bellinger’s sixth of the season. In what is undoubtedly a Rookie of the Year award-worthy campaign, he’s logged 21 solo shots, 11 two-run blasts and a single grand slam. His historic home run topped former NL rookie leaders Frank Robinson and Wally Berger, at 38 homers apiece.

The Dodgers need to stay on top of the Giants to clinch the NL West or, barring that, have the Marlins pull off a win over the Diamondbacks. They currently lead the Giants 4-1 in the bottom of the fifth inning. The Marlins, meanwhile, are staying just ahead of the D-backs with a 9-7 lead in the top of the sixth.