What happened to all the Twins' bunt hits?

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Last year the Twins tied the all-time MLB record
for bunt hits in a season with 68, while no other team managed even 40.
Carlos Gomez led baseball with 30, which would have ranked sixth among teams,
and Alexi Casilla was second in the AL with 16 despite playing only 98
games. Along with Gomez and Casilla combining for 46 bunt hits, Nick
Punto chipped in seven, Joe Mauer, Denard Span, and Matt Tolbert had
four apiece, and nearly five percent of the Twins’ total hits came via

This season has been a much different story,
as the Twins rank just sixth in bunt hits and are on pace to finish
with fewer than half as many as they had last year. Much of the
decrease in bunt hits comes from Gomez being relegated to the bench for
32 of 77 games after starting 143 times last season and Casilla playing
his way back to Triple-A, because they obviously can’t rack up bunt
hits from the dugout or Rochester. With that said, bunting less often
even when they’re in the lineup has also been a factor.

Gomez laid down a bunt in 11 percent of his plate appearances last
year, reaching safely 45.5 percent of the time to become just the fifth
player since 1959 to bunt for at least 30 hits in a season. This year
Gomez has bunted in just six percent of his plate appearances while
reaching safely 27.3 percent of the time. In other words, he’s bunted
about half as often and done so about half as successfully. Much has
been made of Gomez’s decline at the plate, but bunting accounts for
nearly the entire change.

Gomez is hitting just .225 with a .358 slugging percentage on
non-bunts this year, which while terrible is no worse than last season
when he hit .233 with a .348 slugging percentage on non-bunts. In terms
of actual hitting
he hasn’t changed at all, but the difference is that bunts accounted
for over 20 percent of his hits last year and Gomez batted .455 when he
laid one down. This year bunts have accounted for just eight percent of
Gomez’s hits and he’s batted just .273 when he lays one down.

Twins fans have heard all about Gomez’s supposed potential
offensively since the team acquired him as the centerpiece of last
offseason’s Johan Santana trade, but through over 900 plate appearances
in the majors he’s hit .227 with a .337 slugging percentage when not
bunting. Those are putrid numbers and cast serious doubt on Gomez’s
ability to develop into an impact hitter, but the good news is that he
remains one of the game’s fastest players and is a career .433 hitter
when dropping a bunt down.

Because of his great glove in center field Gomez will always have value
regardless of how poorly he’s doing at the plate, but given his success
bunting and how horrible he’s been when swinging away it makes no sense
for him to be laying one down half as often this year. Hitting coach
Joe Vavra surely has him focusing on putting together better at-bats
and taking the ball the other way, which have the potential to make him
a competent hitter, but in the meantime his only real weapon has gone

Casilla bunted almost as often as Gomez last year, laying one down
in nine percent of his trips to the plate, and was nearly as successful
by reaching safely on 43 percent of his attempts. In addition to the
bunting Casilla was also more successful than Gomez on non-bunts,
hitting .265 with a .368 slugging percentage. Those non-bunt numbers
still weren’t good, but they’re positively Mauer-esque compared to
Casilla hitting .162 with a .210 slugging percentage on non-bunts this

As a team the Twins have gone from bunting once every 36 plate
appearances and reaching safely 40 percent of the time in 2008 to
bunting once every 51 plate appearances and reaching safely 28 percent
of the time this year. That might not seem like a huge difference and
certainly the lineup’s dramatically increased power is a much more
important change overall, but when it comes to the light-hitting speed
guys like Gomez, Casilla, Tolbert, and Punto all struggling the lack of
bunts is definitely curious.

Nationals fire reigning Manager of the Year Matt Williams

Washington Nationals' manager Matt Williams looks on from the dugout during a baseball game against the Philadelphia Phillies, Friday, May 2, 2014, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Laurence Kesterson)
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Matt Williams was voted the National League Manager of the Year on November 11, 2014, receiving 18 of 30 first-place votes from Baseball Writers Association of America members.

Today the Nationals fired him following a season full of disappointment, reports of clubhouse discontent, and Jonathan Papelbon choking Bryce Harper in the dugout.

Williams went 179-145 (.552) in two seasons in Washington, which is an excellent winning percentage, but when you take over a stacked team the expectations are extremely high and there was seemingly nothing anyone could point to about his actual managing that suggested he was doing a good job.

His in-game tactics and particularly his rigid bullpen usage patterns infuriated fans. His dealings with the local media became increasingly antagonistic. And even setting aside two players literally fighting in the dugout there’s ample evidence that Williams lost the clubhouse a long time ago.

Williams was far from the only thing wrong with the Nationals this season and he’s hardly the primary person to blame for their disappointing record, but it’s also hard to make a strong case for his sticking around–meaningless, beat writer-voted award or not–and general manager Mike Rizzo predictably acted quickly to move on.

Now we’ll see who gets to take the next crack at managing the Nationals to play up to expectations.

Dan Haren plans to retire after the playoffs are over

Dan Haren
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Dan Haren, who said two months ago that he was leaning toward retiring after the season, reiterated those plans following the Cubs’ regular season finale Sunday.

At age 34 he started 32 games for the Marlins and Cubs with a 3.60 ERA and 132/38 K/BB ratio in 187 innings, so Haren would have no problem finding work and a solid paycheck for 2016.

However, he’s not expected to part of the Cubs’ playoff roster and told Jesse Rogers of ESPN Chicago:

That was it for me. If I have to pitch in the postseason, I’ll be ready for sure. Happy the way the last few starts have gone. Being able to contribute to this amazing team. I’m just thankful to be a part of it. If I don’t pitch in the postseason, that’s it. It’s been fun. Hopefully there’s a lot more games to go. … If my name is called, I’ll be ready.

Injuries has lessened Haren’s overall effectiveness in recent years, but he’s remained a solid mid-rotation starter and has pitched 13 seasons in the big leagues with a 3.75 ERA in 2,419 innings. He made three All-Star teams and earned more than $80 million.