Toronto Tidbits: The Doctor is in and Hill's homers

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Roy Halladay is back from the disabled list
and set to start tonight against the Rays. Prior to being forced from
his June 12 start after three innings because of a groin injury
Halladay had completed at least seven innings in each of his first 13
outings this season and even after missing nearly three weeks he still
leads the league in wins while ranking among the top 10 in innings.

Meanwhile in Toronto, not only did Aaron Hill’s pair of homers last night
establish a new career-high, he broke the Blue Jays’ single-season
record for homers by a second baseman that was previously held by
Roberto Alomar. Oh, and there are still 85 games remaining on the
schedule.

Hill has already gone deep 19 times in 358 plate appearances after
coming into the season with 28 long balls in 1,900 career trips to the
plate, although perhaps the more amazing thing is that through 32 years
as a franchise no Toronto second baseman had ever hit more than 17
homers.

Toronto’s primary second basemen over the years: Alomar, Damaso
Garcia, Manuel Lee, Homer Bush, Orlando Hudson, and now Hill. Danny
Ainge even started 86 games at second base back in 1979, batting .237
with two homers. Most people would probably guess that Alomar is the
team’s all-time leader in games at second base, but it’s actually
Garcia and he hit just 32 homers in 3,756 plate appearances with the
Blue Jays.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.