Bradley has problems, but this ain't one

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The Milton Bradley-Lou Piniella brouhaha erupted and then more or less resolved itself over the weekend, with the name-calling apparently ending on Saturday and the rapprochement beginning (now they’re searching for the leaks). But before we let all of that go, I have to focus for a second on one part of this, and that’s one of the things cited in Saturday’s Sun-Times article detailing the meltdown:

From the front office to the clubhouse, Cubs personnel sympathize
with Bradley’s frustration, and nobody blames him for struggling. But
an apparent preoccupation with his individual issues over the team’s
efforts to shake a first-half malaise has worn on teammates, even down
to things as simple as working close pitches for walks with runners on
base when putting the ball in play with less than two outs might score
a rare and needed run.

Is this really a valid reason to be angry at Bradley? That he’s trying
to get on base? It’s be one thing if he were ignoring bunt signs or
something (not that I’d bunt with Bradley, but hey, directions are
directions) but trying to get on base is pretty much an unequivocal
positive, isn’t it?

I think the final takeaway from all of this is that, for all of his
craziness, there is a pretty rational and self-aware dude somewhere
inside of Milton Bradley. Here he is on Saturday, when asked whether Piniella’s yelling at him was unfair given that there are a lot of hotheads on that Cubs team:

“Like I’ve said, I don’t have the same set of rules as other people.
I’ve committed mistakes in my past to where you don’t get the leeway
other guys might get. To a certain extent, I guess that’s fair.”

(thanks to reader Arun Gupta for catching the on-base bit)

The Brewers have been “aggressive” in their trade talks for Justin Wilson

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I love the trade deadline. Yeah, it’s cool that players get traded, influencing pennant races and all that jazz, but I also love it for the terminology.

So many “internal discussions” and so much tire-kicking. Just today I heard that a team has “gotten some feelers” for a player. That sounds kinda dirty, but in a good wholesome PG-13 sort of way. It’s two solid weeks of euphemism, really.

Sometimes, though, it gets scary. Like the way the Brewers are said to be talking about Justin Wilson of the Tigers:

I suppose if you’re “hanging on for dear life” that even the worst behavior can be excused, but I do hope that Brewers GM David Stearns is not threatening to rough up Tigers GM Al Avila or anything. Can a trade made under duress caused by threats of physical force be vetoed by the commissioner? An interesting analysis to be sure, even if it’s only speculative for now.

As for Wilson, I suppose the Brewers would have to be aggressive. He’s probably the most sought-after pitcher on the market at the moment. The Detroit Free Press reported earlier this week that 10-12 clubs were in on the left-handed reliever. He has a 2.75 ERA in 38 appearances and is striking out 12.5 batters per nine innings. He’s textbook trade deadline fodder, and the Tigers will likely get a nice return for him.

But please, Stearnsy, don’t hurt ’em.

The Indians have expressed an interest in Asdrubal Cabrera

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Jerry Crasnick of ESPN reports that the Indians have expressed interest in Asdrubal Cabrera.

Cabrera, who began his career in Cleveland, would be a utility guy. Which is not exactly the Indians’ greatest need — they need a starting pitcher above all else — but improvement is improvement. Not much improvement in Cabrera’s case as he’s hitting .250/.333/.398 with nine homers in 70 games this season, but that’s useful if he’s cool with a strictly utility role. Which he’d have to be given that the Indians are solid at second, third and short.

Cabrera would come pretty cheaply of course. Partially because he’s not major piece, partially because he sort of hilariously demanded a trade last month. In large part because he wants to play shortstop which, now that I think about it, may complicate this whole “Cabrera for a utility role” idea the Indians seem to have.