22 surgeries, $55 million and one Hall of Fame

Leave a comment

Darren Dreifort is going to be honored with induction into the national surgery hall of fame.

Actually, the oft-injured and frequently maligned former Dodgers
pitcher will be entering the College Baseball Hall of Fame. But is
there any doubt he could qualify for both?

The L.A. Times notes
that Dreifort will be inducted on Friday in Lubbock, Texas, assuming,
in his words, “whether I can walk, or how well I’m getting around.”

It’s nice to see the right-hander honored for his accomplishments at
Wichita State, but is a painful reminder for Dodgers fans of how
injuries derailed the career of a promising pitcher chosen one spot
behind Alex Rodriguez in the 1993 draft. The Dodgers paid Dreifort
nearly $64 million over the course of his career, including a $55
million deal before the 2001 season. For all that money, they got a
48-60 record and 274 appearances as a starter and reliever over parts
of 11 seasons.

The grisly details:

  • Dreifort just had his 22nd surgery, this one on his hip.
  • It was his 20th surgery since leaving college, and his eighth since his last game with the Dodgers, Aug. 16, 2004.
  • Has had two elbow reconstructions, and twice sat out entire seasons.
  • And even though retired, his luck has not changed.

    These days, Dreifort appears to be in peak condition, dressed for
    an interview in shorts, a tight T-shirt and running shoes. He notes,
    however, that he experiences almost constant pain.

    “I’m doing nothing,” he says on the eve of his most recent visit to the operating room, “and I’m still having surgery.”

    Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

    Getty Images
    3 Comments

    Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

    Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

    Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.