The Braves are no longer "America's Team"

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The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Jeff Schultz notes
that, with the Cubs, Yankees, Red Sox and Phillies coming to town, the
Braves stand to play in front of hostile crowds at home for some time:

Fortunately, they will be checking tickets and not allegiances this week at Turner Field.

Revenue isn’t the worst fallback. You take what you can get if
you’re the Braves, particularly when three of the visiting teams on a
home stand — the Cubs, Yankees and Red Sox – come with overstuffed
caravans and the term “meaningful games” locally appears to have a
decreasing shelf life . . .

. . . The Braves knew the Yankees and Red Sox games would be the
year’s hot tickets. It’s one reason why they initially sold them only
through multi-game packs, also hoping to limit the presence of New York
and Boston fans. But that plan didn’t fill the stadium. Individual game
tickets eventually went on sale three weeks ago.

The expected influx of Yankees and Red Sox is not surprising. It
happens everywhere anymore. It’s one of the consequences of ESPN and
FOX’s efforts to make New York and Boston de facto national teams over
the past decade.

What kills me, though, is that there was a time when the Braves were
the de facto national team. Maybe not quite “America’s Team” as Ted
Turner tried to package them, but certainly a team with a fan base
spread across the country thanks to 144 games on TBS every summer. It’s
one of the reasons I’m a Braves fan. I lived in West Virginia when I
was a teenager, and they were the only game on the dial. I watched
every game, and no matter where the Braves played — Cincinnati, Los
Angeles, Chicago and even New York — there was always a surprisingly
strong Braves’ contingent in the stands.

A couple of years ago, however, Braves’ ownership decided to scrap
that plan. From a broadcast perspective, the Braves are now confined to
the south, and thus the national nature of that fan base is atrophying.
I’m certainly losing track of them to some degree, and I presume others
who used to follow them from afar are as well. I suppose the Braves’
suits could point to how much better the Braves are penetrating their
local market since the broadcasting change, but shouldn’t they have
wrapped up that market before now? How many more Meridian, Mississippi
households can they possibly reach?

Atlanta fans are famously fair-weather, so the low attendance Jeff
Schultz cites in this article is no real surprise given their poor play
of late. One wonders, however, if there would be a greater enthusiasm
for this team if they, like the Yankees and Red Sox, were consistently
reaching a national audience like they used to.

Marcus Stroman loses no-hit bid in the seventh inning of WBC final against Puerto Rico

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
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Update (11:57 PM ET): And it’s over. Angel Pagan led off the bottom of the seventh with a line drive double down the left field line off of Stroman, ending the no-hitter. Manager Jim Leyland immediately removed Stroman from the game.

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U.S. starter Marcus Stroman has held Puerto Rico hitless through six innings thus far in the World Baseball Classic final. The Blue Jays’ right-hander has held the opposition to just one base runner — a walk — with three strikeouts on 68 pitches.

WBC rules limit a pitcher to throwing a maximum of 95 pitches in the Championship Round, so Stroman has 27 pitches left with which to play. If he hits the limit during the at-bat, he can continue throwing to the completion of that at-bat. Needless to say, though, Stroman won’t be finishing his potential no-no.

The U.S. has given four runs of support to Stroman. Ian Kinsler hit a two-run homer in the third inning. Then, in the fifth, Christian Yelich and Andrew McCutchen both provided RBI singles. Update: The U.S. tacked on three more in the top of the seventh when Brandon Crawford drove in two with a bases-loaded single and Giancarlo Stanton followed up with an RBI single.

We’ll keep you updated as Stroman and any pitchers that follow him attempt to complete the no-hitter. Shairon Martis is the only player to throw a no-hitter in WBC history. However, the game ended after seven innings due to the mercy rule, or as it’s known now, the “early termination” rule.

Video: Ian Kinsler homers in WBC final, rounds bases solemnly

Harry How/Getty Images
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Ian Kinsler found himself in hot water on Wednesday evening when he criticized the way players from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic play baseball. It is his hope that kids watching the World Baseball Classic decide to emulate the emotionless way players from the U.S. play baseball as opposed to the exciting, cheerful way players from other countries tend to play the game.

Needless to say, Kinsler’s comments didn’t sit well with many people, but he has the most recent laugh. Kinsler broke a scoreless tie in the top of the third inning of Wednesday night’s WBC final against Puerto Rico, slugging a two-run home run to left-center field at Dodger Stadium off of Seth Lugo.

Kinsler, of course, rounded the bases solemnly which is sure to highlight just how cool and exciting the game of baseball is to international viewers.