The Braves are no longer "America's Team"

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The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Jeff Schultz notes
that, with the Cubs, Yankees, Red Sox and Phillies coming to town, the
Braves stand to play in front of hostile crowds at home for some time:

Fortunately, they will be checking tickets and not allegiances this week at Turner Field.

Revenue isn’t the worst fallback. You take what you can get if
you’re the Braves, particularly when three of the visiting teams on a
home stand — the Cubs, Yankees and Red Sox – come with overstuffed
caravans and the term “meaningful games” locally appears to have a
decreasing shelf life . . .

. . . The Braves knew the Yankees and Red Sox games would be the
year’s hot tickets. It’s one reason why they initially sold them only
through multi-game packs, also hoping to limit the presence of New York
and Boston fans. But that plan didn’t fill the stadium. Individual game
tickets eventually went on sale three weeks ago.

The expected influx of Yankees and Red Sox is not surprising. It
happens everywhere anymore. It’s one of the consequences of ESPN and
FOX’s efforts to make New York and Boston de facto national teams over
the past decade.

What kills me, though, is that there was a time when the Braves were
the de facto national team. Maybe not quite “America’s Team” as Ted
Turner tried to package them, but certainly a team with a fan base
spread across the country thanks to 144 games on TBS every summer. It’s
one of the reasons I’m a Braves fan. I lived in West Virginia when I
was a teenager, and they were the only game on the dial. I watched
every game, and no matter where the Braves played — Cincinnati, Los
Angeles, Chicago and even New York — there was always a surprisingly
strong Braves’ contingent in the stands.

A couple of years ago, however, Braves’ ownership decided to scrap
that plan. From a broadcast perspective, the Braves are now confined to
the south, and thus the national nature of that fan base is atrophying.
I’m certainly losing track of them to some degree, and I presume others
who used to follow them from afar are as well. I suppose the Braves’
suits could point to how much better the Braves are penetrating their
local market since the broadcasting change, but shouldn’t they have
wrapped up that market before now? How many more Meridian, Mississippi
households can they possibly reach?

Atlanta fans are famously fair-weather, so the low attendance Jeff
Schultz cites in this article is no real surprise given their poor play
of late. One wonders, however, if there would be a greater enthusiasm
for this team if they, like the Yankees and Red Sox, were consistently
reaching a national audience like they used to.

Red Sox set a new major league record with 11 strikeouts in a row

BALTIMORE, MD - SEPTEMBER 20: Starting pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez #52 of the Boston Red Sox works the first inning against the Baltimore Orioles at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on September 20, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
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Lost in the nifty base running by Dustin Pedroia that won Sunday’s game against the Rays, the Red Sox set a new major league record by striking out 11 batters in a row, per Peter Abraham of The Boston Globe. Starter Eduardo Rodriguez struck out the final six Rays he faced and reliever Heath Hembree struck out five Rays in a row after that. Tom Seaver had the previous consecutive strikeout streak of 10, set on April 22, 1970 against the Padres.

The Red Sox also set a team record with 23 strikeouts in total: 13 by Rodriguez, five by Hembree, one by Matt Barnes, and four by Joe Kelly. Per Abraham, that’s the most strikeouts in a 10-inning game since at least 1913 and the most in a game of any length since 2004.

For Rodriguez, Sunday marked the first double-digit strikeout game of his career. He has pitched quite well since returning to the rotation at the start of the second half. Over 13 starts, the lefty has a 3.10 ERA with a 70/23 K/BB ratio in 72 2/3 innings.

Dodgers clinch NL West on Charlie Culberson’s walk-off home run

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 20: Charlie Culberson #6 of the Los Angeles Dodgers runs to first base after hitting a single RBI in the second inning against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on July 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Matt Hazlett/Getty Images)
Matt Hazlett/Getty Images
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Dodgers second baseman Charlie Culberson delivered a walk-off solo home run in the bottom of the 10th inning, clinching the NL West for the Dodgers on Sunday afternoon. What a way to celebrate Vin Scully’s final home game behind the microphone.

The Dodgers were trailing 2-1 in the seventh inning, but shortstop Corey Seager tripled in a run to tie the game. Rockies outfielder David Dahl untied the game in the top of the ninth with a two-out solo home run off of Kenley Jansen. But Seager once again rose to the occasion, blasting a game-tying solo shot in the bottom half of the ninth against Adam Ottavino. That would set the stage for Culberson in the next frame.

Culberson, a former Rockie, came into the afternoon with a .591 OPS and zero home runs in 53 plate appearances. He finished the afternoon 3-for-5 with the homer.

It’s the fourth consecutive season in which the Dodgers have won the NL West. The Cubs have clinched the best record, which means they’ll play the winner of the Wild Card game. The Dodgers will play the Nationals in the NLDS. The Nationals have a 1.5-game lead over the Dodgers for home-field advantage, so both teams are still playing for something of importance in the regular season’s final week.