Donald Fehr to step down

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ESPN is reporting that MLBPA honcho Don Fehr is stepping down:

Don Fehr is stepping down as executive director of the Major League
Baseball Players Association, a position he’s held since the mid-1980s,
a source tells ESPN.

Fehr will be replaced by general counsel Michael Weiner, pending
board approval, the source said. An announcement is expected to be made
later on Monday afternoon.

Fehr, who will turn 61 in July, was voted in to lead the players’ union in December 1985.

Let’s be clear here: Don Fehr is not a popular man. Indeed, he’s the
only guy the baseball-loving public holds in lower esteem than Bud
Selig, and that really takes some doing. He has been blamed for
everything bad that has happened in baseball since 1985, be it the
1994-95 lockout, the steroids mess, huge player salaries, baggy pants,
gold chains and everything else that differentiates baseball of today
from the baseball of yesterday.

The thing about him, though, is that the only people he cares about —
the players whose interests he represents — owe just about everything good
that has happened to them in that time to him as well. Those things
include his handling of the 1994-95 lockout, the huge salaries, their
right to wear baggy pants and gold chains and just about everything
else that differentiates baseball of today from the baseball of
yesterday. The point here is that no matter how much you hate him, Don
Fehr had one job to do and that was to make life better for the
players. He did that in spades. A rookie made $60,000 a year when Fehr
took over and the game’s biggest stars made around $2 million. Today
they’re making ten times what they made back then. More importantly,
back in 1985 the owners seemed to believe that they could break the law
and collude against players, tear up the Collective Bargaining
Agreement when it suited them, and generally try to run roughshod over
players’ rights. That garbage stopped under Fehr’s leadership, and you
can bet that the players are grateful for it.

The big exception here is PEDs. Here is where, in my view anyway,
Fehr’s instincts to fight tooth-and-nail against ownership ultimately
did the union’s membership a disservice. Yes, many were responsible for
the steroids mess, but it took Fehr too long to recognize that, unlike
your usual labor stuff, there were competing interests within union
membership on the issue of PEDs and a strong public interest in the
subject as well. Fehr ignored that for far too long, which had the
effect of throwing both users and non-users under the public relations
bus. My sense is that almost everything you’ll read about this in the
coming days will greatly overplay his handling of steroids and greatly
underplay his accomplishments (stuff like this), but it’s not like we can ignore that aspect of his job performance either.

According to the article, the union’s general counsel will be taking
over, so you can assume that there will be little change in the union’s
approach going forward. But regardless of the continuity of it all,
Donald Fehr’s departure leave eaves some pretty large shoes to fill.

Report: Kyle Schwarber will return to the Arizona Fall League on Saturday

CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 16:  Injured player Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs is seen in the dugout before a game against the Milwaukee Brewers at Wrigley Field on August 16, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Cubs’ outfielder Kyle Schwarber will return to the playing field on Saturday, per a report by the Chicago Tribune’s Mark Gonzales. The club’s prized left fielder suffered a season-ending injury when he collided with Dexter Fowler back in April, tearing both his ACL and LCL and undergoing intensive knee surgery later that month.

While no nerve damage was discovered during the surgery, the Cubs have kept a close eye on Schwarber during his recovery and put a kibosh on any part-time or full-time role with the team until the spring of 2017. Getting a few reps in during the Arizona Fall League appears to be the last step in the 23-year-old’s rehab process. He will be part of the Mesa Solar Sox’ ‘taxi squad,’ making him eligible for games on Wednesdays and Saturdays only.

Schwarber batted .246/.355/.487 with 16 in 69 games with the Cubs during his debut season in 2015. He will be added to the Mesa Solar Sox roster in advance of their set against the Salt River Rafters on Saturday evening.

Playoff Reset: Cubs vs. Dodgers NLCS Game 6

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 16:  Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers stands on the pitcher's mound during game two of the National League Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field on October 16, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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The Game: Los Angeles Dodgers @ Chicago Cubs NLCS Game 6
The Time: 8:00 PM EDT
The Place: Wrigley Field, Chicago
The Channel: FS1
The Starters: Kyle Hendricks (Cubs) vs. Clayton Kershaw (Dodgers)

The Upshot:

We’re pulling out the big guns for this one. The Cubs took Los Angeles by storm again in Game 5, closing out their road trip with an eight-run spread over the Dodgers, and tonight they’ll try to clinch the NLCS on home turf in Game 6.

Pitching-wise, it’s a rematch of Game 2 with Kyle Hendricks (16-8, 2.13 ERA) and Clayton Kershaw (12-4, 1.69 ERA) on the mound. Kershaw took the first set against the Cubs, going seven scoreless innings with six strikeouts in Game 2 while Hendricks held the Dodgers to a single run over 5 1/3 innings. Adrian Gonzalez was the only Dodger to capitalize on Hendricks’ cutter, going yard in his first at-bat to generate a 1-0 lead.

The Cubs’ biggest strength so far this series has been an electric offense, something the Dodgers have struggled to replicate against left-hander Jon Lester and Joe Maddon’s airtight bullpen. While they’ve already beaten Hendricks at Wrigley Field once this October, they’ll need Kershaw to go the distance in another playoff gem if they intend to keep the Cubs’ championship hopes at bay with a 3.4-run average. Should Kershaw and his crew knot the series again, the tiebreaker will fall to Rich Hill and Jake Arrieta in Game 7.