And That Happened: Sunday's scores and recaps

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Red Sox 6, Braves 5: First time I got to watch the Braves on TBS in like forever,
and they just stink up the joint. All of that bad defense combined with
weather imported from Scotland made this game about the only bad thing
that happened to me on Father’s Day. If it wasn’t for home plate umpire Bill Hohn’s AMAZING mustache, this game would have been a total loss for me.

Cardinals 12, Royals 5:
Albert Pujols (4-5, 2 HR, 2B, 6 RBI) can’t be bargained with. He can’t
be reasoned with, He doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And he
absolutely will not stop, ever, until you are dead.

Padres 4, A’s 1:
According to the game story, the fathers of Brian Giles, Edgar and
Adrian Gonzalez, Luke Gregorson, Kevin Kouzmanoff, Cla Meredith, Edward
Mujica, Joe Thatcher, Tony Gwynn and Kevin Correia threw out the first
pitch to their respective sons before the game in honor of Father’s
Day. Then, in the true spirit of baseball fathers everywhere, they all
got drunk and paced behind the backstop while angrily yelling at the
coach to put their boys in.

Marlins 6, Yankees 5:
Sabathia left the game early with tightness in his left bicep. He says
it’s not serious, and given that (a) it was 95 degrees and humid; and
(b) Sabathia sweats barbecue sauce, you have to figure it was some kind
of heat-induced cramping or something. According to the game story Alex
Rodriguez — playing in his hometown of Miami — said he reserved about
100 tickets for family and friends. I’m dubious. I read a book last
month that said he had no friends, and they couldn’t have printed such
a thing if it weren’t true, right? In other news, the Yankees dropped
four of six to the Nats and Marlins in the past week, though I suppose
if Girardi’s protest succeeds there’s a chance to improve that to three of six (note: protests never, ever succeed).

Rockies 5, Pirates 4:
The Rockies begin to rip off another winning streak, winning this one
behind Clint Barmes (2-3, 2B, HR, 2 RBI). All of this winning has them
doing things like taking one of their more marketable commodities off the market.
I still say it’s ultimately in vain — Colorado will be watching the
playoffs on TBS and FOX just like you and me — but in the meantime,
mazel tov for the Rockies fans.

White Sox 4, Reds 1:
Mark Buehrle just went out and acted all Mark Buehrle-y: seven strong
innings, very little b.s. He looked good, but nowhere near as good as
the Sox looked on Saturday night in those blue roadies.

Tigers 3, Brewers 2: Justin Verlander likes pitching against Milwaukee. The first time he faced them he threw a no-hitter. The second time — yesterday — he struck out eight and gave up two runs in seven and two-thirds.

Rays 10, Mets 6:
Upton, Crawford and Longoria went 11 for 16 with seven RBIs, and the
Rays have now won eight of eleven. The Mets, on the other hand, are in
a one-step-forward-two-steps-back kind of rut, having dropped an awful
lot of series lately.

Blue Jays 9, Nationals 4:
Someone finally douses the red-hot Nats. Well, relatively speaking
anyway. It was Ricky Romero stepping up for Toronto, giving up two over
seven innings on a day when the bullpen needed a rest following a
couple of extra innings games.

Orioles 2, Phillies 1:
Man, has Cole Hamels pitched in some bad luck lately. Last time out he
got the no-decision after giving up only two runs in six innings, and
yesterday it was two runs in eight innings with ten strikeouts. The
Phillies lineup — minus Ryan Howard, who didn’t play for the first
time in 343 games because he has some nasty sinus infection — just
couldn’t do a thing against Jeremy Guthrie, mustering only four hits on
the day. Hamels after the game: “I think the key is we’re in first
place. We’re fortunate everyone in the NL East is playing really bad.”
Man, the Nats can’t any props even when things are going good for them.

Cubs 6, Indians 2:
You know, if Jeremy Sowers could figure out a way to fix that little
hitch in his delivery, the only thing keeping him from stardom would be
his complete and utter inability to get anyone out.

Astros 4, Twins 1:
Despite his teammates’ best efforts to kill him — Darin Erstad lined a
ball off Rodriguez’s left side during batting practice on Saturday —
Wandy Rodriguez was pretty spectacular yesterday (7 IP, 2H, 1 ER). “We
need to keep playing good baseball. That’s the biggest key for us,”
manager Cecil Cooper said after the game. Astute observations like that
are why Cooper makes the big bucks.

Mariners 3, Diamondbacks 2:
The game ended when, with two outs and the score tied, first basemen
Tony Clark simply dropped a routine throw from the third baseman,
turning what would have been out number three into the game-losing
error. I’ve been watching baseball for over 30 years, and I can’t
recall ever seeing a game end like that.

Dodgers 5, Angels 3:
I can’t tell if Clayton Kershaw is trying to grow mutton chops or if he
simply has the most pathetic mustache in the history of baseball. He’s
certainly no Bill Hohn, that’s for sure. He can pitch, however,
shutting out the Angels over seven innings. Juan Pierre keeps up the
good work two, hitting a couple of RBI doubles. At first I thought that
Pierre’s 50 games in the sun would allow him to rest contently, knowing
that he proved a lot of naysayers wrong about his ability to start on a
winning team. Now I’m wondering if he’ll overplay his hand and demand
all kinds of playing time based on his track record once Manny returns.

Giants 3, Rangers 2:
Barry Zito had a no-hitter going until he gave up a two-run homer to
Andruw Jones in the seventh, but an RBI single by Randy Winn in the
bottom of the inning preserved the win for Zito and the Giants.
Watching Zito face Jones in 2009 has to be a lot like watching Flair
face Steamboat in 1995. Something that you would have once paid a lot
to see, but now you just hope no one gets too terribly injured.

Must-read: A profile on former Rays prospect Brandon Martin, currently in jail for alleged murders of three men

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Nathan Fenno of the Los Angeles Times has an outstanding profile of former Rays prospect Brandon Martin, who is currently in jail for allegedly murdering three men nearly two years ago.

Fenno describes Martin’s erratic personality as he became a highly-touted baseball prospect who then descends into drug use. Friends described Martin has having completely changed into an unrecognizable person. Martin had repeated conflicts with friends and family such that police reports became common and he was placed in a psychiatric facility. Sadly, the facility only held him for less than 48 hours. He would allegedly murder three people upon returning home: his father, his brother-in-law, and a home security system contractor. Martin fled from police, who eventually caught up to him and subdued him with the help of a police dog.

Fenno’s profile is really worth a read, so click here to check it out.

Martin, 23, was selected by the Rays in the first round (38th overall) of the 2011 draft. He spent three years in the Rays’ system, reaching as high as Single-A Bowling Green.

Pedro Martinez: “If I was pitching, I was going to drill Machado, as much as I love him.”

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On Sunday, Red Sox reliever Matt Barnes was ejected for throwing at Orioles third baseman Manny Machado‘s head. It was revenge for a slide of Machado’s which ended up injuring Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia. Barnes was suspended four games.

Hall of Famer and former Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez said that if he were in Barnes’ shoes, he would have also thrown at Machado, although not necessarily at his head. Via ESPN’s Scott Lauber:

If I was pitching, I was going to drill Machado, as much as I love him. The only thing I would’ve done differently is probably bring the ball a little bit lower.

Martinez added that Machado “did not intend to hurt Pedroia. And I know that because I know Machado.” And he doesn’t think Barnes meant to throw at Machado’s head.

Martinez, of course, was certainly a pitcher who wasn’t afraid to pitch inside to batters and even hit a few of them when he felt he or his teammates had been wronged. This is an unfortunate part of baseball’s culture and the fact that it continues means that it will eventually result in someone being seriously hurt. It’s disappointing that Martinez isn’t willing to be a better role model now that his playing days are over. Martinez could have set an example for today’s pitchers by saying what Barnes did crossed a line. Getting a Hall of Famer’s seal of approval will only embolden players now when they feel they must defend their teammates’ honor.

The “tradition” of beaning batters to defend one’s teammates is anachronistic in today’s game, especially when Major League Baseball has made strides in so many other ways recently to protect players’ safety.