10 most likely to be traded – Outfielders

Leave a comment

Matt Holliday (Athletics) – The early-month surge hasn’t held up, as
the A’s have gone 3-6 since interleague play resumed. While Oakland is
still just seven games back, there’s nothing to suggest the team will
ever get healthy enough to make a real run. Holliday, who has been an
above average regular since the end of April, even if he’s still not
playing at his usual level, would have no problem bringing back more
than the A’s could get if they held on to him and let him go for draft
picks at season end. San Francisco makes more sense as a possible
destination with every victory and every Fred Lewis strikeout.

Ryan Spilborghs (Rockies) – Ideally, the Rockies would have been
able to do something with Spilborghs before they turned him into a
fifth outfielder. As an adequate center fielder and a plus corner
outfielder with a career OPS of 823 and a salary barely above the
minimum, he’d come in handy just about anywhere. The Cardinals, in
particular, could use someone with his ability to hit southpaws.

Jeff Francoeur (Braves) – The Braves still might have had a shot at
getting a prospect for Francoeur a month ago. Now they’d be lucky just
to find someone to take his salary without having to accept a similar
contract back. Interestingly, he’s gone from posting a 23/1 K/BB ratio
in May to a 6/7 this month, but he’s remained just as useless.

Cody Ross (Marlins) – Ross is pretty similar to Spilborghs, but his
home run power will likely make him more expensive to acquire. A career
.249/.305/.436 hitter against righties, he still makes a lot more sense
as a fourth outfielder than as a regular. However, he has been terrific
for the Marlins over the last two months. That he’ll likely double his
current $2.25 million salary next year is the main reason he could be
put on the market.

Josh Willingham (Nationals) – Willingham’s incredible nine-homer,
13-RBI season to date is worthy of its own post, but while he has been
a huge failure hitting with men on base this year, it’s not a
career-long trend. Willingham doesn’t offer a whole lot on defense and
his history of back troubles would make him a poor choice for a
long-term contract, but he’s a legitimate 25-homer guy and he hits
righties better than alternatives like Spilborghs and Ross. He’d be a
great fit for Minnesota’s lineup.

Eric Hinske (Pirates) – He’s been a fairly valuable player off the
bench, but Hinske never made a lot of sense for a Pirates team that
opened the season with fellow left-handed hitters at all three outfield
spots and at first base. He’ll probably be cashed in for a prospect
before the deadline. The Mets and Tigers could both use the extra
left-handed bat.

Jeremy Hermida (Marlins) – It’s the story of Hermida’s career: he
had 11 hits, three of them homers, in a five-game stretch from June
9-13, only to go hitless in five games since. There are still plenty of
teams intrigued by Hermida’s talent, and the Marlins could improve
their defense by going back to Cameron Maybin in center and shifting
Ross to right field. Still, his trade value should be just as high in
November as it is now, making it more likely that he’ll stay.

Jermaine Dye (White Sox) – While the White Sox still look like
potential buyers right now, they might turn into sellers before the
deadline. If that’s the case, Dye would be the most obvious candidate
to go. He’s been their best player with a .264/.339/.514 line, and the
$12 million mutual option on his contract might not satisfy either
party for 2010.

Jake Fox (Cubs) – Fox isn’t going to bring a whole lot in return,
but the soon-to-be 27-year-old former catcher deserves more of an
opportunity that the Cubs can give him after hitting .409/.495/.841
with 17 homers in 45 games for Triple-A Iowa this season.

Delmon Young (Twins) – Minnesota is very much in the hunt for the AL
Central, yet Young remains a big liability while hitting for no power
at all and striking out 11 times as often as he walks. The Twins can’t
glue him to the bench or send him down, so they may be better off
moving him while there are still teams out there that may think they
can turn him around. The Nationals, Padres and Pirates are among the
clubs that would have to take hard looks at Young’s upside if he became
available.

Cubs sign Brett Anderson to a $3.5 million deal

Brett Anderson
AP Photo/J Pat Carter
Leave a comment

Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports that the Cubs have signed pitcher Brett Anderson to a contract, pending a physical. Anderson, apparently, impressed the Cubs during a bullpen session held in Arizona recently. According to Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports, the deal is for $3.5 million, but incentives can bring the total value up to $10 million.

Anderson, 28, has only made a total of 53 starts and 12 relief appearances over the past five seasons due to a litany of injuries. This past season, he made just three starts and one relief appearance, yielding 15 runs on 25 hits and four walks with five strikeouts in 11 1/3 innings. The lefty dealt with back, wrist, and blister issues throughout the year.

When he’s healthy, Anderson is a solid arm to have at the back of a starting rotation or in the bullpen. The defending world champion Cubs aren’t risking much in bringing him on board.

Yordano Ventura’s remaining contract hinges on the results of his toxicology report

DETROIT, MI - SEPTEMBER 24: Yordano Ventura #30 of the Kansas City Royals pitches against the Detroit Tigers during the first inning at Comerica Park on September 24, 2016 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Duane Burleson/Getty Images)
Duane Burleson/Getty Images
2 Comments

Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports provides an interesting window into how teams handle a player’s contract after he has died in an accident. It was reported on Sunday that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a car accident in the Dominican Republic. He had three guaranteed years at a combined $19.25 million as well as two $12 million club options with a $1 million buyout each for the 2020-21 seasons.

What happens to that money? Well, that depends on the results of a toxicology report, Rosenthal explains. If it is revealed that Ventura was driving under the influence, payment to his estate can be nullified. The Royals may still choose to pay his estate some money as a gesture of good will, but they would be under no obligation to do so. However, if Ventura’s death was accidental and not caused by his driving under the influence, then his contract remains fully guaranteed and the Royals would have to pay it towards his estate. The Royals would be reimbursed by insurance for an as yet unknown portion of that contract.

The results of the toxicology report won’t be known for another three weeks, according to Royals GM Dayton Moore. Dominican Republic authorities said that there was no alcohol found at the scene.

Ventura’s situation is different than that of Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez, who died in a boating accident this past September. Fernandez was not under contract beyond 2016. He was also legally drunk and cocaine was found in his system after the accident. Still, it is unclear whether or not Fernandez was driving the boat. As a result, his estate will receive an accidental death payment of $1.05 million as well as $450,000 through the players’ standard benefits package, Rosenthal points out.