Potent quotables: Weaver brothers make history

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“Mentally and physically I am exhausted. One of the most ill-felt victories ever. It wasn’t easy for either of us.”

– Jeff Weaver, after outpitching his brother Jered
in a 6-4 win over the Angels on Saturday night. They became the first
siblings to pitch against each other since Andy and Alan Benes did it
in 2002.

“People make assumptions about what
our activity would be, which is probably not unreasonable, but at the
same time, I never thought we’re required to be the rest of the
league’s farm system.”

– Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail tells Jeff Zrebiec of the Baltimore Sun
that the club is not in “salary dump mode.” A number of players,
including Aubrey Huff, Melvin Mora and George Sherrill figure to draw
interest as the trade deadline approaches.

“Baseball is an expensive sport. That’s why a lot of African-Americans don’t play it. You gotta have a bat, a ball, a glove, a catching
glove, cleats — so many things. The fields. If you look at all those
commercials on TV, you never see a baseball commercial. You see LeBron
[James]. You see Terrell Owens. You don’t see that in baseball. Kids
think it’s boring. I thank my parents for that, that I had one of those
old Flintstone Wiffle ball bats. Big, fat bat. If it wasn’t for that, I
wouldn’t have played baseball.”

– Brandon Phillips, commenting on the lack of African-Americans in the majors.
The Reds fell to the White Sox 10-8 in Saturday’s third annual Civil
Rights Game. The event attracted a sold out crowd of 42.234 and names
like Frank Robinson, Hank Aaron, Bill Cosby, former President Bill
Clinton, and Muhammad Ali.

“It’s just a matter of competing. Do
I think he could play without embarrassing himself? Yes. But it’s best
just to play games and get acclimated. I think that’s important. He
doesn’t need to put up numbers.”

– Manager Joe Torre comments on Manny Ramirez, who agreed to start a minor league rehab assignment with Triple-A Albuquerque on Tuesday. He is eligible to return from his 50 game suspension on July 3 in San Diego.

“The big deal is probably that a lot
of people aren’t familiar with what he went through, how serious of a
surgery he had and the fatigue that he went through. Everything is
always (bigger) when it’s Alex.”

– Manager Joe Girardi does his best to downplay Alex Rodriguez’s two days off. A-Rod may have needed a breather, but according to the New York Post, that didn’t stop him from attending a private party with Kate Hudson in the wee hours of the morning on Saturday.

Yoenis Cespedes blames a lack of golf for his early season slump

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Back during the 2015 playoffs the sorts of New York media types who love to find reasons to criticize players for petty reasons decided to criticize Yoenis Cespedes for playing golf the day of a playoff game. The Mets won the series with the Cubs during which the controversy, such as it was, occurred and it was soon dropped.

It was picked back up again in 2016 when Cespedes, while on the disabled list with a strained quad, was seen playing golf. Despite the fact that everyone involved said that golf did not contribute to his injury and that golf would have no impact on his injured quad, it was deemed “a bad look” by a columnist looking to get some mileage out of bashing Cespedes for having a hobby that probably half of all ballplayers share. They did it when he showed off his fancy cars too, by the way, even though just about every ballplayer has a fancy car or three. When you’re a superstar in New York — especially when you’re one with whom the media is not particularly close for various reasons — you’re going to catch hell for seemingly nothing.

Now there’s a new twist to the Cespedes golf saga. Yoenis himself says that his poor start — he’s hitting .195/.258/.354 and leads the league in strikeouts — is due to . . . not enough golf! From the New York Times:

He gave a possible reason for the poor start this weekend: not playing enough golf, a hobby beloved by many baseball players. And, yes, he is serious.

“In previous seasons, one of the things I did when I wasn’t going well was to play golf,” he said after a game on Friday in which he struck out four times but still drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th inning. “This year, I’m not playing golf.”

The story says Cespedes quit golf last summer because he worried that it was contributing to hamstring problems. He’s thinking about going back to it soon, as he thinks it’ll help his swing. Given that he’ll catch hell either way, he may as well do what he wants.