Strong Island's Finest: Pitchers

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In honor of the U.S. Open out at Bethpage this weekend, let’s look at
the greatest baseball players from Long Island, or Strong Island for
all you meatheads, in Major League history. The position players are here. Now the pitchers:

Frank Viola, Hempstead. 15 seasons with Twins, Mets, Red Sox,
Reds, and Blue Jays … 176-150 W-L, 3.73 ERA, 1.301 WHIP, 1,844 K in
2,836.1 IP … 1988 A.L. Cy Young with Minnesota … 6 seasons with 15+
wins … 1987 World Series Champion & MVP (won Game 1 and Game 7) … 3
All-Star games … All-Star mustache … prompted Mets fans to hang musical
notes for every strikeout … FROM! St. John’s.

Pete Harnisch, Commack. 14 seasons with Orioles, Astros, Mets,
Brewers, and Reds … 111-103 W-L, 3.89 ERA, 1.296 WHIP, 1,368 K in
1,959.0 IP … 1991 All-Star … led N.L. with 4 shutouts in 1993 … 26th
pitcher to strike out the side with only 9 pitches on September 6, 1991
against the Phillies … gave up back-to-back-to-back homers against the
Padres on Opening Day, 1997.

Pete Richert, Floral Park. 13 seasons with Dodgers, Senators,
Orioles, Cardinals, and Phillies … 80-73 W-L, 3.19 ERA, 1.186 WHIP, 51
SV, 925 K in 1,165.2 IP … 3 All-Star games … 1970 World Series Champion
… shares a distinction with John Smoltz for being players who have been
traded for Doyle Alexander.

Jason Marquis, Manhasset. 10 seasons (and counting) with Braves,
Cardinals, Cubs, and Rockies … 88-74 W-L, 4.49 ERA, 1.419 WHIP, 796 K
in 1,366.0 IP … led N.L. in L, ER, and HRA in 2006 … 4.76 ERA in 10
postseason appearances … .531 OPS, 5 HR … Silver Slugger in 2005.

John Habyan, Bay Shore. 11 seasons with Orioles, Yankees,
Royals, Cardinals, Angels, and Rockies … 26-24 W-L, 3.85 ERA, 1.358
WHIP, 12 SV, 372 K in 532.1 IP … former teammates with Mel Hall.

Paul Gibson, Southampton. 8 seasons with Tigers, Mets, and
Yankees … 22-24 W-L, 4.07 ERA, 1.448 WHIP, 345 K in 556.2 IP … gave me
pitching lessons in Bellport in 1999.

Matt Daley, Garden City. Rookie with the Rockies … ace pitcher for 2000 NY State Champion Garden City Trojans.

Twins place Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with shin injury

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The Twins have placed third baseman Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with a stress reaction in his left shin, per the Star Tribune’s LaVelle E. Neal. Sano left Saturday’s game against the Diamondbacks after running out a ground ball double play in the fourth inning and was held out of Sunday’s lineup.

Sano, 24, is batting .267/.356/.514 with 28 home runs and 77 RBI in 475 plate appearances this season. The Twins are five back of the Indians for first place in the AL Central and currently hold a tie with the Angels for the second Wild Card slot.

Ehire Adrianza got the start at third base during Sunday’s win and could handle the hot corner while Sano is out. Eduardo Escobar could also get some time at third.

Buster Posey thinks Hector Neris hit him on purpose

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Giants catcher Buster Posey was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the eighth inning during Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Phillies. It was a first-pitch fastball from closer Hector Neris, who had just entered the game. The Giants then had the bases loaded, but Pablo Sandoval struck out to end the inning and the Giants went on to lose 5-2.

After the game, Posey said he thinks Neris hit him on purpose, per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. Posey thinks Neris thought he couldn’t get him out.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Neris said “absolutely not” when asked if he threw at Posey on purpose. The rest of the Phillies clubhouse, per Zolecki, “Say whaaat?!”

Here’s a link to the video of Posey getting hit. Now that we have automatic intentional walks, pitchers don’t even have to risk throwing four pitches wide of the strike zone to intentionally walk a hitter, so if Neris felt he couldn’t get Posey out, there was still no need to hit him. Furthermore, Neris isn’t going to hit Posey to load the bases and put the go-ahead run on first in a 4-2 ballgame. Sandoval has been a much worse hitter than Posey, for sure, but Neris would lose the platoon advantage if he felt like facing Sandoval instead, anyway.

Getting hit hurts, so it’s understandable Posey may have been salty in the moment. But after the game, when the pain has subsided and he’s had time to think over everything, there’s no way Posey should still come to the conclusion that Neris was trying to hit him on purpose.