And That Happened: Wednesday's scores and recaps

Leave a comment

Orioles 6, Mets 4: Matt Wieters hits the first of what the
prophecies have foretold will be a thousand career home runs, each more
majestic than the last. The real story was the middle of the O’s order
— Markakis, Huff and Mora — who combined to go 8 for 11 with four
RBI.

Blue Jays 7, Phillies 1: I sat back on the couch and watched
this game, hoping to relax after a long day. But then Sutcliffe and Co.
start talking about the Jerod Morris/Raul Ibanez affair. Look, I don’t
come into your house and talk about your work when you’re off, so what
makes you think you can do it to me?

Nationals 3, Yankees 2: Wang pitched, but he was way less
responsible for the Yankees losing than was John Lannan (8.1 IP, 4 H, 2
ER). Five run game, three of them scored on homers.

Angels 4, Giants 3: Six straight wins for the Angels, who hung
around long enough to finally get to Tim Lincecum. It’s nice when you
can pinch hit Vlad Guerrero and Torii Hunter late in the game.

White Sox 4, Cubs 1: Piniella after the game: “Danks pitched a
good game, they executed a good squeeze bunt, and we didn’t do much
offensively. That’s about it. That’s the ballgame in a nutshell.” Hey
Lou, I do the recaps around here, got it?

Reds 4, Braves 3: Micah Owings’ three run homer was the big blow
of the game. If he played for the Braves, he’d be the team’s second
best outfielder in terms of OBP. Javier Vazquez has pitched better than
anyone could have hoped entering this year, but the dude is still only
4-6 because, I dunno, the universe hates him or something.

Red Sox 6, Marlins 1: The Brad Penny trade deadline audition
continues, with the commodity in question giving up 0 ER on three hits
in five innings, though he had to make 100 pitches and gave up four
walks in the process. David Ortiz walked twice, got a hit and scored
all three times on base. Pedroia had a big game too. The team made a
big deal out if it being the 500th straight sellout, including the fans
in all kinds of fun. The game story doesn’t say whether or not anyone
dangling their free tape measures or gawking at the giant “500” mowed
into the outfield realized that the sellout streak is why they had t
sell a kidney in order to buy their tickets on StubHub.

Cardinals 4, Tigers 3: A couple of Curtis Granderson homers aren’t enough for Detroit, as the Cardinals and Tigers trade little jabs all night.

Pirates 8, Twins 2: Andrew McCutchen over his first 13 games:
.339/.381/.492. That’s better than Nate McLouth is doing, both on the
season and since the trade. Are Pirates fans still supposed to be mad
about this?

Rockies 5, Rays 3: David Price has to pitch in Coors Field.
That’s bad. But he lasts a bit longer into a game than he has been
lately. That’s good! He still gives up ten hits and five runs and loses
the game. That’s Bad. But he gets more economical with his pitches,
walking no one. That’s good! The postgame spread contains sodium
benzoate . . . That’s bad. Can I go now?

Rangers 5, Astros 4: The battle for Texas rages on! So far,
Houston is down 2-0. If they don’t turn things around soon, they’re
going to be stuck with Texas.

Diamondbacks 12, Royals 5: Greinke’s return to Earth continues, as the Dbacks rough him up for six runs over six and two-thirds (four earned).

Brewers 9, Indians 8: Trevor Hoffman blew his first save of the
season, but the Brewers pull it out in extras. And really, it’s the
Indians’ bullpen that should be ashamed of itself, having given up 21
hits, 14 walks and 18 runs in 14 innings against Milwaukee.

A’s 5, Dodgers 4: Trevor Cahill started wild, but settled down
and then somehow managed to survive three errors by his mates which led
to three unearned runs. The A’s will take it.

Mariners 4, Padres 3: Rob continues to claim
that the American League is “playing a different game” and “a better
game.” And he may be right. But how much of that difference is
attributable to the Padres alone? I mean, jeez, they’ve lost 13
straight games to the AL, and that sort of skews things a bit, doesn’t
it?

Chris Sale doesn’t regret protesting wearing White Sox retro uniform

SAN DIEGO, CA - JULY 12:  Chris Sale #49 of the Chicago White Sox reacts during the 87th Annual MLB All-Star Game at PETCO Park on July 12, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Harry How/Getty Images
18 Comments

White Sox ace Chris Sale was scratched from Saturday night’s start against the Tigers due to a confrontation he had with White Sox coaches and front office staff over the 1976 retro uniforms the club was to wear. Sale used a knife to cut up his uniform as well as the uniforms of some other players, protesting the club’s decision to wear them. The White Sox suspended Sale five games “for violating team rules, for insubordination, and for destroying team equipment.”

Sale spoke about the incident for the first time, as MLB.com’s Scott Merkin reports. The lefty apologized to fans who came to see him pitch and said he regrets “not being there for my guys,” referring to the bullpen, which had to cover for Sale on Saturday. Matt Albers got the spot start and went two innings.

Sale felt the uniform would have impacted his performance, saying, “[The ’76 uniforms] are uncomfortable and unorthodox. I didn’t want to go out there and not be at the top of my game in every aspect that I need to be in. Not only that, but I didn’t want anything to alter my mechanics. … There’s a lot of different things that went into it. Looking bad had absolutely zero to do with it. Nothing.”

Sale was firm that he doesn’t regret standing up for he believes in. “Absolutely not,” he said. He continued, “Do I regret saying business should not be first before winning? Absolutely not.”

With his five-game suspension to end after Wednesday’s game, Sale is on track to start Thursday against the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

Dee Gordon will return from his 80-game suspension on Thursday

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 10:  Dee Gordon #9 of the Miami Marlins runs the bases against the Washington Nationals at Nationals Park on April 10, 2016 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Greg Fiume/Getty Images)
Greg Fiume/Getty Images
Leave a comment

At the end of April, Marlins second baseman Dee Gordon was handed an 80-game suspension by Major League Baseball after testing positive for exogenous testosterone and Clostebol, performance-enhancing drugs. Gordon says he took those substances unknowingly.

Gordon will return to the Marlins on Thursday, MLB.com’s Joe Frisaro reports. The club was 10-11 prior to Gordon’s suspension. Since then, the club has gone 43-35 and is now tied with the Mets for second place in the NL East, five games behind the Nationals. Impressively, the Marlins have collectively hit .272/.330/.408 in Gordon’s absence, which compares favorably to the league average .252/.320/.410 triple-slash line.

Gordon, who made the NL All-Star team in 2014 and ’15, was hitting .266/.289/.340 with three doubles, two triples, five RBI, 13 runs scored, and six stolen bases in 97 plate appearances. Derek Dietrich has handled second base in the meantime and has done an admirable job, batting .275/.366/.398 with 22 extra-base hits, 30 RBI, and 26 runs scored in 314 PA. Nevertheless, Gordon is likely to return to full-time duty at second base.